Spanish National – Ramiro Ledesma http://ramiroledesma.com/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:22:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ramiroledesma.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Spanish National – Ramiro Ledesma http://ramiroledesma.com/ 32 32 Members of Congress call for investigation into conditions of Texas National Guard https://ramiroledesma.com/members-of-congress-call-for-investigation-into-conditions-of-texas-national-guard/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/members-of-congress-call-for-investigation-into-conditions-of-texas-national-guard/ This article is co-published and co-reported with Military Times, an independent news agency covering issues important to the U.S. military. Sign up for his daily Early Bird Brief newsletter here. For 24/7 mental health support, in English or Spanish, call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s toll-free hotline at 800-662-4357. You can also […]]]>
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Too much meat? Spain’s factory farming debate creates beef – the Citizen https://ramiroledesma.com/too-much-meat-spains-factory-farming-debate-creates-beef-the-citizen/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 01:55:56 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/too-much-meat-spains-factory-farming-debate-creates-beef-the-citizen/ Debate over the environmental impact of Spain’s huge factory farming sector is intensifying in the country, Europe’s largest meat consumer, and dividing its ruling coalition. The meat problem in Spain Unsustainable industrial agriculture In an interview published in the British daily The Guardian, Consumer Minister Alberto Garzon has lashed out against Spain’s so-called mega-farms, calling […]]]>



Debate over the environmental impact of Spain’s huge factory farming sector is intensifying in the country, Europe’s largest meat consumer, and dividing its ruling coalition.

The meat problem in Spain

Unsustainable industrial agriculture

In an interview published in the British daily The Guardian, Consumer Minister Alberto Garzon has lashed out against Spain’s so-called mega-farms, calling them unsustainable.

“They find a village in a depopulated corner of Spain and put 4,000, 5,000 or 10,000 head of cattle there,” he said.

“They pollute the soil, they pollute the water and then they export this shoddy meat from these mistreated animals.”

Garzon is the coordinator of the small United Left party, a junior member of the minority coalition government led by Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez, and his comments angered farmers.

“There are no mistreated animals in Spain, Minister,” UPA union, which represents small producers, said in a statement.

“An attack on pastoralists and farmers”

He said Garzon’s statements were “based on lies, clumsy, myopic and could have adverse effects on Spanish meat exports.”

Pablo Casado, the leader of the main conservative opposition Popular Party (PP) which is strong in some rural areas, also weighed in, calling Garzon’s remarks “an attack on pastoralists and farmers and the image of our country. country”.

Government spokeswoman Isabel Rodriguez said Garzon was speaking in a personal capacity.

She added that the government “supports the livestock sector, which contributes decisively to our exports.”

READ ALSO: Food poisoning: could Johannesburg’s street meat kill you?

Breeding weight

The debate risks deepening the rift between the Socialists and left-wing coalition partner Podemos ahead of elections in the Castile and León region, north of Madrid, as the PP leads the polls.

Garzon had already been criticized in July for urging Spaniards to reduce their meat consumption, prompting Sanchez to say that for him “nothing beats a well-done steak”.

For Salvador Calvet, professor at the University of Valencia who studies the sector, the outcry over Garzon’s remarks is due to the cultural and economic weight of breeding, which supports “many families”.

Factory farming, a profitable industry

It is responsible for some 2.5 million jobs in the country and accounts for nine billion euros ($ 10 billion) in annual exports, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO ).

And it’s booming.

Meat production has increased tenfold in Spain over the past 60 years, a larger increase than in most other European countries, according to a database from the University of Oxford.

Although there are fewer farms, their size is “getting bigger and bigger,” Calvet said.

The sector’s growth is fueled by external demand, especially from China, as well as Spain, where ham, chorizo ​​sausages and other animal products are a key part of the diet. many people.

Meat consumption in Spain

Each Spaniard eats an average of 98.8 kilograms (218 pounds) of meat per year, compared to a global average of 42 kilograms, according to FAO figures.

This makes Spain the biggest consumer of meat in Europe, ahead of Portugal with 98.7 kilograms and Poland with 88.5 kilograms.

This level of consumption rises to more than 270 grams per day, “while international scientific recommendations recommend 300 grams of consumption per week,” the environmental group Greenpeace said in a statement.

He warned that the consequences of this overconsumption are “devastating”.

“Legitimate debate”

Greenpeace was one of several environmental groups that backed Garzon, who also came under fire for banning ads for sugary foods aimed at children and for cracking down on the betting industry.

“There is a legitimate debate” about the environmental impact of animal husbandry but the reality is “complex and nuanced,” Calvet said.

Breeders have “improved” their practices in recent years but they could still do more, he added.

Valentin Bontempts © Agence France-Presse

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Liverpool are ready to offer Barcelona prodigy Gavi FIFTY times his current salary to seal £ 80,000-a-week transfer https://ramiroledesma.com/liverpool-are-ready-to-offer-barcelona-prodigy-gavi-fifty-times-his-current-salary-to-seal-80000-a-week-transfer/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 07:50:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/liverpool-are-ready-to-offer-barcelona-prodigy-gavi-fifty-times-his-current-salary-to-seal-80000-a-week-transfer/ LIVERPOOL are reportedly ready to offer Barcelona starlet Gavi nearly FIFTY times his current salary to sign him. The 17-year-old broke into La Liga’s first team this quarter and caught the attention of Jurgen Klopp. 1 Liverpool will offer Gavi huge pay raise to leave Barcelona for themCredit: Getty And although he’s only made four […]]]>

LIVERPOOL are reportedly ready to offer Barcelona starlet Gavi nearly FIFTY times his current salary to sign him.

The 17-year-old broke into La Liga’s first team this quarter and caught the attention of Jurgen Klopp.

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Liverpool will offer Gavi huge pay raise to leave Barcelona for themCredit: Getty

And although he’s only made four top-flight appearances, he’s already convinced the Anfield boss to try and make a stunt for him.

Gavi currently earns around £ 1,600 a week at Camp Nou.

But El Nacional claim Liverpool are willing to pay him £ 80,000 a week in order to secure his signature.

The same outlet also indicates that the La Masia graduate sees his future in Barcelona.

However, his release clause remains at a relatively low amount of £ 41.7million and the financially struggling Catalans could be tempted to take advantage of the playmaker.

Barça have already eased the pressure on their payroll by transferring Philipe Coutinho to Aston Villa on loan.

But Ferran Torres is coming from Manchester City, which means they still have some work to do to help balance the books.

The Spaniard’s registration is still pending, which is why Barca are freeing him salaries in their team.

And Gavi’s potential transfer exit along with Coutinho’s could trigger the space it takes for him to become active.

Gavi joined the Barcelona academy in 2015 at the age of 11.

He signed his first pro contract in September 2020 and continued to play for Barcelona B that year.

The talented teenager was promoted to the first team last summer and has already broken into the Spanish national team.

Liverpool are looking for reinforcements in an attempt to close the 11-point gap on Premier League leaders Man City.

?? Read our Transfer News Live blog for the latest rumors, gossip and closed deals

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1921 England and Wales Census Reveals War-Affected Nation | Census https://ramiroledesma.com/1921-england-and-wales-census-reveals-war-affected-nation-census/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:18:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/1921-england-and-wales-census-reveals-war-affected-nation-census/ An intimate and unique snapshot of a nation reeling from the aftermath of World War I was released to the public on Thursday when the National Archives of England and Wales’ 1921 census went online. The unprecedented glimpse of life 100 years ago reveals the very personal impact of the economic crisis, the housing crisis […]]]>

An intimate and unique snapshot of a nation reeling from the aftermath of World War I was released to the public on Thursday when the National Archives of England and Wales’ 1921 census went online.

The unprecedented glimpse of life 100 years ago reveals the very personal impact of the economic crisis, the housing crisis and the major social changes caused by the war and the Spanish flu pandemic, capturing the desperation, the anger and sorrow of the 38 million people who completed the form.

It also reveals a very British sense of subversion and humor: for the first time, the Census asked the profession of each member of the household.

Tongue pressed firmly into cheek, Constance Bernard Fitzhamon of Middlesex, listed the occupations of her three young children as “doing silly things”, “doing more silly things” and, for her 11 month old, as “taking care of bottles. “.

Despite being an official document meant to put together dry statistics, the census shines with emotional gems: John Platt’s son was born in Monmouthshire, Wales, the same night the census was completed: “Baby Boy Platt” was proudly listed by his father as having only two hours on the form, too young to even have a name.

On the same day, also in Monmouthshire, a baby girl born appeared to have been literally named as the census was completed. Martha Wall first registered her newborn baby as “Day Baby” before crossing it out and adding Rose’s name.

Enumerators, local officials who often knew the families, sometimes added additional details to the forms. William Hamilton of Newcastle upon Tyne mysteriously noted that he had a private income. The investigator added – even more mysteriously – “Never worked. Benefit from the Egyptian pension of the father ”.

The British love of animals – or perhaps the national penchant for mild subversion – is evident in the many families who have listed pets among their household members, most notably “Bobby the dog” and “Tarzan the cat. “.

“Enumerators rarely had a sense of humor about these entries and crossed them out,” said David Olusoga, professor of public history at the University of Manchester.

Francis Sutcliffe of Kirkdale, Lancashire, for example, had his entry for “Kitty the Cat” crossed out with the blunt explanation that Kitty was simply: “A domestic cat”.

Mary McKee, head of content publishing operations at Findmypast, said they expected humor and slight sabotage from a document that, after all, was difficult to complete.

“But what we weren’t expecting was the bureaucratic graffiti,” she said. “People were angry that the government had promised them a post-war ‘country fit for heroes’, but instead faced mass unemployment and substandard housing. “

Many people used the form to protest: “David Lloyd George, build houses,” Henry Burrough said in Durham in a large note added to the form. “Lloyd George is hereby requested to present this ‘Land Fit for Heroes’,” he added. “The nation’s duty to provide houses. “

James Eldon Haynes from Yorkshire agreed. “Without work in the land worthy of heroes,” he wrote. Robert Stevens in Liverpool, who was out of work and had 12 children, wrote: ‘Please help me. Times are hard. “

“It’s fascinating to see how many people have overturned the census and used it as a means to protest against those in power,” said Olusoga. “This use of the census reminds me of how people are now using Twitter.”

The way the census must have been completed revealed other intimate details: It must have been completed by June 19 by midnight.

That night, Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle appeared to be holding a shoot. “The census shows he was hosting a number of mystics and psychics that night,” McKee said. “A session seems the logical explanation for this gathering.”

Other hidden treasures have been discovered during the three years of intensive conservation and digitization devoted to the census.

A menagerie of dead insects has been found in its pages: 532 historic insects from a century ago.

“I don’t know what was done with them,” Olusoga said. “I like to think that an environmental scientist took them to create a dead zoo.”

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Barriers rise for descendants of Spanish Jews who demand the right of return | Local news https://ramiroledesma.com/barriers-rise-for-descendants-of-spanish-jews-who-demand-the-right-of-return-local-news/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/barriers-rise-for-descendants-of-spanish-jews-who-demand-the-right-of-return-local-news/ More than 500 years after Spain banished tens of thousands of Jews during the Inquisition, the Spanish parliament attempted to atone for the transgression by offering descendants a right of return and a path to citizenship. The program, approved in 2015, has proven to be popular. But after receiving an avalanche of nominations, perhaps more […]]]>

More than 500 years after Spain banished tens of thousands of Jews during the Inquisition, the Spanish parliament attempted to atone for the transgression by offering descendants a right of return and a path to citizenship.

The program, approved in 2015, has proven to be popular. But after receiving an avalanche of nominations, perhaps more than 50,000, Spain recently changed its rules, leaving many candidates in limbo and categorically rejecting others – a move that risked reopening the injuries that the nation had sought to heal.

Several New Mexico descendants of banished Jews were among those whose nominations stalled. They turned to elected officials for help.

In October, US Representative Teresa Leger Fernández and US Senator Ben Ray Luján joined other Democratic lawmakers in appealing to Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez.

“This situation negatively affects our voters and strain the bonds between our nations,” wrote congress delegates. “We respectfully urge you to investigate and remove the arbitrary bureaucratic barriers that have made the approval of Sephardic Jews nearly impossible after spending countless hours and thousands of dollars to profit from this important program.”

US Representatives Andy Levin of Michigan joined Leger Fernández and Luján in signing the letter; Mike Levin and Lucille Roybal-Allard from California; and Alan Lowenthal, Ritchie Torres and Debbie Wasserman Schultz of New York; and US Senator Dianne Feinstein of California.

“We urge you to reverse these changes and ensure that every eligible Sephardic Jewish descendant can receive the citizenship of their ancestral home under the law, as desired by the Cortes Generales,” lawmakers said.

Leger Fernández said they had not received a response from Sánchez.

“True heritage”

Jean Stevens, a retired teacher who lives in Ranchos de Taos, began the process of applying for Spanish citizenship in 2017. She had learned that her father’s ancestors had come from the states of Sonora and Baja in southern Mexico. -western United States when she discovered a number of marriage licenses. and death certificates in his family archives.

Stevens, 72, spent two years collecting his ancestral documents while studying Spanish and taking online courses to prepare for the Spanish constitution test required for citizenship.

“I went [to Spain] for a few weeks in 2018 to put my papers in order with the lawyer and the Spanish notary [magistrate]”Stevens said.

She waited over two years for an answer.

“August 2021, the Spanish government let me know what was going on. My request was refused, ”she said. “They hooked me for all these years, since the start of 2019, when they said everything was going for the candidates at that point.”

Stevens said the denial of his candidacy was traumatic. “I had really trusted the Spanish government.”

Stevens has a half-brother who she says didn’t tell her about her father’s death until his last hours. She asked for, but never received, money from her father’s estate, she said. She also asked for duplicate family photos and never got them.

Digging into his ancestors was a way to be close to his father again. “I saw this as a way to get my real inheritance,” Stevens said.

Conversions and evictions

The Spanish Inquisition began in 1478 under King Ferninand II and Queen Isabella to maintain Catholic orthodoxy in Spain and its colonies. Formerly known as the Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisición, it replaced the medieval Inquisition, which was under papal control.

The Inquisition, dissolved in 1812, forced the conversion or expulsion of up to 300,000 Spanish Jews, according to various estimates. It was also used to identify heretics (called Judaizers or Crypto-Jews) who continued to secretly practice Judaism while outwardly professing Catholicism.

Juan Blázquez Miguel, author of Inquisition y cryptojudaísmo, wrote that over 37,000 crypto-Jews have been tried and over 3,700 have been burned alive.

Jews who fled Spain settled in other parts of Europe, as well as in North Africa and the Middle East. Many then settled in Spanish-speaking areas of the New World, including Mexico, and some moved to northern New Mexico.

“Undo these changes”

In 2015, Spain’s King Felipe VI delivered a speech to Sephardic Jews and their descendants, apologizing for the wrongdoings of the past and welcoming them back to Spain.

“Thank you for having preserved, like a precious treasure, your language and your customs. They are also ours, ”he said. “Thank you also for having made love outweighed by resentment and for teaching your children to love this country.”

Over the next four years, Spain accepted tens of thousands of citizenship applications from descendants of Spanish Jews.

Many people in New Mexico seeking to establish their genealogical heritage for a right of return have received assistance from the New Mexico Jewish Federation.

“This represents one of our core values, which is to bring together exiles,” said CEO Rob Lennick.

Lennick examines history, migration patterns, and family names to establish Jewish ancestry, and makes references to professional genealogists.

“They are our neighbors and friends, and their historic migration brought them primarily to New Mexico,” he said. “And this discovery is very important and very significant for them whether or not they apply for citizenship in Spain.”

Recently, however, a number of major bureaucratic changes to the Right of Return program have slowed – and even stopped – the process.

Leger Fernández and his colleagues wrote in their letter to the Prime Minister: “Before this year, only one person had been turned down and some 34,000 had been accepted. This year, thousands of people have been turned down and even more have not received a response.

“Although the ambassador [to the U.S. Santiago] Cabanas told our offices that the process of granting nationality through this channel has not changed, it seems that there are many changes that have resulted in rejections, ”the letter continued.

These changes include the cancellation of the authority to notaries verify Sephardic ancestry, refuse certificates of Sephardic origin issued by authorized Jewish organizations, change the requirements of genealogical records already submitted, and retroactively require that a “special connection” – such as a donation to a Spanish charity – be occurred before the right of return was offered.

“We urge you to reverse these changes. The broken promise of the noble act of reparation hurts more than if Spain had never made the return offer in the first place, ”the US lawmakers wrote.

About fifty demonstrators, including Leger Fernández, gathered on October 11 in front of the Spanish Consulate General in New York to express their frustrations at the delays and refusals of applications.

“When Spain offered the right of return, it meant a lot to my community,” said Leger Fernández. “We don’t want the hope and leadership that Spain has shown the world to fade away.”

Jason Guberman, executive director of the American Sephardic Federation, added, “This is an issue that brings together the Hispanic community and the Jewish community. Together we will win. Together we must overcome.

Genealogy verified

Tim Rivera, owner of Rivera Family Funerals & Cremations, was one of the protesters outside the Spanish Consulate General that day in Manhattan.

Rivera, 60, had seen an exhibition titled Fractured Faith: Spanish Judaism, Inquisition and New World Identities at the New Mexico History Museum in 2016.

“It was something my grandmother – her siblings, my uncle – used to talk about,” he said. “When I saw this exhibit, I was like, ‘Oh, I guess it wasn’t just family traditions.’ “

Rivera had studied in Spain at university. His wife is Jewish. He said that when his Jewish genealogy was verified, “it was a very moving moment.”

He started the process of applying for Spanish citizenship in October 2017: gathering documents, studying Spanish, going through an FBI background check, and learning about the Spanish constitution.

After two years of preparation, Rivera flew to Spain in the fall of 2019 and applied through his lawyer. “We were told that the notary is the gatekeeper in terms of checking documents to make sure you have met government qualifications.

“There is a web portal where you can monitor if something has been done,” he said. “He kept saying it was under review.”

After months of waiting, Rivera’s lawyer told him that the Spanish government was holding back not only his claim, but many others.

River said, “Everyone lives in fear of being rejected. “

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Winemakers take the plunge to produce fine wines in iconic Spanish wine region https://ramiroledesma.com/winemakers-take-the-plunge-to-produce-fine-wines-in-iconic-spanish-wine-region/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:56:10 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/winemakers-take-the-plunge-to-produce-fine-wines-in-iconic-spanish-wine-region/ Hands of an elderly farmer holding a handful of soil and a plant getty Crouching close to the ground, a sharp pain rose in his knees and lower back as thirsty hands reached out to old vines, about 50 years old, to harvest the few concentrated clusters of Tempranillo grapes that appeared to be hanging […]]]>

Crouching close to the ground, a sharp pain rose in his knees and lower back as thirsty hands reached out to old vines, about 50 years old, to harvest the few concentrated clusters of Tempranillo grapes that appeared to be hanging from a tree. skeleton of a bush plant with its thick, gnarled trunk. The sun beating down on his head forced his eyes to squint to combat the glare and dirt on his face and his hands softened the harsh effects of the sun as he plucked his precious fruit. His wife and children were there to help; his ten-year-old son, already a seasoned harvester by his skill and speed; his parents, who were of old age, still stubbornly insisted on helping, even though often they would only be able to walk through a few vines at the end of the day – each vine producing only a relatively small amount of fruit.

It’s not so amazing to think that a winemaker and his family would put such a backbreaking amount of work into their own vineyard that produced incredibly concentrated and well-balanced Tempranillo grapes, but the real shock is that, for decades, he went into making bulk wine.

Ribera del Duero

Today, Ribera del Duero is a famous wine region in Spain with wine producers such as Vega Sicilia and Pesquera who have both helped to associate this wine region with exceptional red wines made from their Tempranillo grape (called Tinto Fino à Ribera del Duero) and in Cas de Vega Sicilia, a small amount of Bordeaux grape varieties mixed in some bottlings. Bodegas Vega Sicilia has a long history dating back to 1864, which is quite impressive considering that it survived the Spanish Civil War and 36 years of Franco’s dictatorship which on several occasions targeted Spaniards and citizens who were considered part of the demonized elite class. ; Coincidentally, Pesquera’s first vintage was 1975 – the year Franco died. Francisco Franco was a man who did not drink a lot of wine and is said to have no appreciation for it other than being an economic engine for Spain; this attitude has led to the destruction of many vineyards, especially those producing white wines, and a demand for an enormous amount of red wine in bulk; he even banned artisanal cheese made by small cheese makers.

And even though many old Tempranillo vines belonging to generations of wine growers in Ribera del Duero were spared by staying under the radar during Franco’s reign, they were forced to sell the fruits for bulk wine production; these precious bunches of grapes from these amazing old vines was thrown away with a bag of mixed grapes.

Spain as a whole is still grappling with its past which involved Franco as he is considered by some to be the man who brought order to chaotic Spain and ultimately brought the Spanish miracle that began in 1959 ( enormous growth of the Spanish economy) as opposed to others thinking of him as a ruthless dictator who was responsible for the death, torture and destruction of many Spanish families who still bear the scars of the Franco era. Iconic Spanish wine producer Miguel Torres explained how his own father, Miguel Torres senior, was dumped in one of Franco’s concentration camps and still today, due to a deal after Franco’s death to look only to the future, the number of people he killed and locked up is still not known as the full impact of his destructive reign has not been fully recognized by the Spanish government; such avoidance of trying to make amends for the past, unlike what Germany did with regard to the Nazi Party’s crimes against humanity, upheld Catalonia’s candidacy for independence because no other region suffered as much as Catalonia under Franco’s reign. Miguel Torres said people still lived in fear for decades after Franco’s death, as it was never clear if his way of governing had already faded – many believing that behind closed doors “Francoism” could still exist and therefore why many had remained silent about the atrocities. committed against their own family until recently.

Bodegas Vilano

And so it makes sense, given the history of Spain, that the family owners of such extraordinary old Tempranillo vines keep their heads down and give fruit so precious to make cheap bulk wine under the watchful eye of the government. But in 1957, ten winegrowers from Ribera del Duero, with vines that are half a century old, decided to form a cooperative that eventually took the name of Bodegas Viña Vilano in order to be able to pool their resources to produce and sell them- even their wines. Of course, it was still risky back then to do anything in this way considered to be creating a premium product and so they sold their wine as regular table wine which was not. just a few steps from the nationalized bulk wine.

But in 1999, with around 80 local winemakers being part of the cooperative, while seeing how well received other wine producers in Ribera del Duero had become for making fine wines, they invested in cellar equipment. at the cutting edge of technology and quality barrels to raise the quality of their wines while changing the name to simply Bodegas Vilano.

Today, the grandchildren of these producers still operate their own small plots of vineyards while producing more premium offerings ranging from Roble, Crianza and Reserva Tempranillo wines which are sold domestically, but a few ‘Signature bottlings. Of good wine, which express the special qualities of their old vines, have made their way to the American market: Terra Incognita and La Baraja.

Terra Incognita is a selection of the oldest vines among the members, vines ranging from 80 to over 100 years old – most of the vines of the original ten members were already 50 years old by the mid-1950s; and La Baraja, which is the only blended wine from Bodegas Vilano because all their red wines are 100% Tempranillo like Terra Incognita, is a blend of 75% Tempranillo from 70-year-old vines and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon and 10% Merlot from vines between 35 and 37 years old – La Baraja comes from a single vineyard called La Baraja and is therefore only produced in the best years for that vineyard.

Symbiotic relationship in wine region with icons

The easiest thing for a leader to do is to blame a particular group – a strategy that has been used repeatedly throughout history with tragic consequences; contrasts with great leaders who take the difficult path of doing what is right for the country as a whole, which involves taking full responsibility for the ups and downs of people’s livelihoods, even when the reality of life is that many things, like national economies, cannot be controlled by one person or even a government – certain cycles of life are beyond direct human control.

And over time, the benefits of these emblematic producers of the Ribera del Duero materialize; playing with their money and bearing stressful overhead costs, they have made the old vines of these family farmers appreciated for the great wines they are capable of producing. Many current members of Bodegas Vilano know that their grandparents could never have imagined that their vines would be so respected nationally, let alone globally.

And so when a grandson goes into the vineyards like his grandparents, it’s always the same sun that beats down on his head, the same dirt that covers his face and hands and the same vines that come from his thicken, more gnarled trunks over time but there is a big difference – instead of being overwhelming work with no future, no hope and no value, it is now a rewarding task to be a part owner of a business that transforms the long cherished grapes of your grandparents into an exciting fine wine that is appreciated as something rare and special around the world.

2019 Bodegas Vilano, ‘Terra Incognita’, Ribera del Duero, Spain: 100% Tempranillo (called Tinto Fino in Ribera del Duero) ranging from vines from 80 to over 100 years old. Rich, dark flavors of black fruits and hints of cocoa powder with a fleshy entry accompanied by a finer tannic structure on the mid-palate and great precision on the finish with a note of raised orange peel.

2016 Bodegas Vilano, ‘La Baraja’, Vignoble La Baraja, Ribera del Duero, Spain: 75% Tempranillo (called Tinto Fino in Ribera del Duero) from 70-year-old vines and 15% Cabernet and 10% Merlot from 35 to 37 -vines one year old. A nice blend of blackberry and red cherry with an additional complexity of fresh leather and crushed rock aromas in the background with lacy tannins that weave a good concentration of fruit on the palate; an elegant and powerful wine at the same time. Since La Baraja comes from a single vineyard called La Baraja, it is only produced in the best years for that vineyard and therefore the next vintage will not be until the 2019 release after aging.

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Serbian player unsure of Djokovic’s Australian Open plans https://ramiroledesma.com/serbian-player-unsure-of-djokovics-australian-open-plans/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 02:53:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/serbian-player-unsure-of-djokovics-australian-open-plans/ SYDNEY – Serbian tennis player Dusan Lajovic says he’s not sure Novak Djokovic will play the Australian Open and that he and other teammates don’t know the reason Djokovic withdrew from the ATP Cup . Djokovic is reportedly looking for a men’s record for the 21st Grand Slam title and a 10th Australian Open crown […]]]>

Serbian tennis player Dusan Lajovic says he’s not sure Novak Djokovic will play the Australian Open and that he and other teammates don’t know the reason Djokovic withdrew from the ATP Cup .

Djokovic is reportedly looking for a men’s record for the 21st Grand Slam title and a 10th Australian Open crown at Melbourne Park from January 17.

Djokovic, 34, is on the entry list but has yet to commit to the Australian Open following the COVID-19 vaccination mandate agreed to by Tennis Australia and the Victoria Department of Health (State ).

Djokovic has repeatedly refused to disclose whether or not he was vaccinated, citing confidentiality concerns. All Australian Open spectators, staff and players must be double vaccinated or have medical exemption.

Lajovic, the late call to replace Djokovic, said he and his team were unsure whether the No.1-ranked player would participate in Melbourne.

“He kept in touch with all of us and it was a last minute decision, the Australian Open is still uncertain, I don’t know the information,” Lajovic said Thursday. “I think that will come in the next few days or at every deadline. We don’t know at the moment, but I hope he will be there and he can play the Grand Slam.

Lajovic said Djokovic did not disclose the reasons Serbia failed to defend the ATP Cup.

“He said I won’t come to the ATP Cup, we’ll see for the Australian Open,” Lajovic said. “He didn’t say whether he was coming or not, (but) he’s waiting for a decision.”

Roger Federer has already confirmed he will not play in Melbourne due to continued recovery from right knee surgery. Rafael Nadal, who along with Federer and Djokovic has 20 Grand Slam singles titles, is recovering from COVID-19 and has said he still hopes to play at the Australian Open.

The 16-team ATP Cup kicks off on Saturday at two stadiums in Sydney.

ATP Cup organizers disclosed Djokovic’s withdrawal in a roster update that included France replacing Austria in the event following the withdrawals of Dominic Thiem and Dennis Novak.

Fifth-placed Russian Andrey Rublev also retired, as did his team-mates Aslan Karatsev and Evgeny Donskoy.

Serbia face Norway on Saturday. Chile also play against Spain, Argentina against Georgia and Greece against Poland.

The other eight teams will start playing on Sunday: Russia against France, Italy against Australia, Canada against the United States and Germany against Great Britain.

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Young Barca star rejects Spain’s national team and opts for Morocco instead https://ramiroledesma.com/young-barca-star-rejects-spains-national-team-and-opts-for-morocco-instead/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 07:43:37 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/young-barca-star-rejects-spains-national-team-and-opts-for-morocco-instead/ The past two months have been extremely special for Barcelona starlet Ez Abde. Having only signed for the club last summer from Hercules CF, the winger was playing for the B team at the start of the campaign. But, interim manager Sergi Barjuan, who took charge of the first team after Ronald Koeman was sacked, […]]]>

The past two months have been extremely special for Barcelona starlet Ez Abde.

Having only signed for the club last summer from Hercules CF, the winger was playing for the B team at the start of the campaign. But, interim manager Sergi Barjuan, who took charge of the first team after Ronald Koeman was sacked, decided to hand him his senior bow.

Although he didn’t have the most memorable debut, Abde impressed new manager Xavi Hernandez enough to keep him with the first team. And, since then, the 20-year-old hasn’t looked back, establishing himself as a regular in the starting XI with a series of impressive performances on the wings.

The former ace of Hercules made eight senior appearances for the Blaugrana, scoring a goal in the process. His rapid progress has now prompted the soccer federations of Spain and Morocco to fight over who he represents internationally.

According to Moroccan media outlet Le360 Sport (h / t MARCA), national team head coach Vahid Halihodzic called on Abde to join the team ahead of the next Africa Cup of Nations and the Barcelona star has fully intend to respond positively to the call.

The report further states that the young winger changed his Instagram bio to “a FC Barcelona player and an international player with the Moroccan national team. “

At the same time, Qatari media beIN Sports (h / t MARCA) claims the Spanish Football Federation is working to convince Abde to snub Morocco to represent him. La Roja at an international level.

But the aforementioned Le360 Sport report adds that the 20-year-old intends to don only the colors of the Moroccan national team.

On top of that, it is also claimed that the 20-year-old will make serious efforts to ensure that he is available for the Africa Cup of Nations which will take place between January 9 and February 6, despite the Barça’s refusal to let him go. for the mid-season tournament.

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Aubameyang updates, LAST Coutinho, Kolasinac at Watford, Tomiyasu injury, Norwich build-up https://ramiroledesma.com/aubameyang-updates-last-coutinho-kolasinac-at-watford-tomiyasu-injury-norwich-build-up/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 17:52:20 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/aubameyang-updates-last-coutinho-kolasinac-at-watford-tomiyasu-injury-norwich-build-up/ CHRISTMAS SONG AND BOARD GAMES Arsenal legend Ray Parlor has revealed how the club’s academy stars had to sing Christmas carols outside London Colney to earn tips from first-team players. The 48-year-old said that as part of the Gunners’ festive tradition, the youngsters sang in an attempt to win Christmas bonuses. In addition to cleaning […]]]>

CHRISTMAS SONG AND BOARD GAMES

Arsenal legend Ray Parlor has revealed how the club’s academy stars had to sing Christmas carols outside London Colney to earn tips from first-team players.

The 48-year-old said that as part of the Gunners’ festive tradition, the youngsters sang in an attempt to win Christmas bonuses.

In addition to cleaning senior footballers’ shoes, academy players had to stand on a box outside the club’s training ground before singing iconic chants.

Speaking to talkSPORT, Parlor, who made his Arsenal debut in January 1992, said: “I was getting £ 27.50 a week.

“It was an important thing for the apprentices was that they got a bonus from the players whose boots they cleaned.

“So what you had to do was there was a big box outside the London Colney training ground, each apprentice had to stand on the box to sing a Christmas carol.

“They were paid based on how they sang. You really wanted the big guys, David O’Leary’s and Tony Adams and that kind of guy because they would give you more money.

“I had three players from the reserve squad, it was a nightmare, I probably got a ten each, £ 20 each maybe.”

Parlor also recalled the time he was thrown into the mud by the iconic Captain Adams after his portrayal of “Little Donkey”.

He remarked: “They had prepared buckets of water and it was obviously a very cold morning when we have to sing.

“I had to sign ‘Little Donkey’ and I only got Donkey and Tony Adams sued me because at that time his name was the Donkey. Donkey Adams.

“He chased me, got me, put me in the mud, real mud all over you, buckets of water running over your head.”

“But I didn’t have to sing. Believe it or not, the players were really nervous before going out and singing in front of George Graham, the first team, it’s a nightmare, really.

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Spain to demand face masks outside as infections skyrocket https://ramiroledesma.com/spain-to-demand-face-masks-outside-as-infections-skyrocket/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 18:56:15 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/spain-to-demand-face-masks-outside-as-infections-skyrocket/ Spain will re-impose a national rule requiring the use of masks outdoors, the government said, as the country grapples with a spike in Covid-19 infections. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s office will hold a meeting tomorrow to approve the decree, the government said in a statement, without specifying when it would come into force. Spain ended […]]]>

Spain will re-impose a national rule requiring the use of masks outdoors, the government said, as the country grapples with a spike in Covid-19 infections.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s office will hold a meeting tomorrow to approve the decree, the government said in a statement, without specifying when it would come into force.

Spain ended the mandatory use of outdoor masks at the end of June, while still requiring them indoors in public spaces or in crowded outdoor spaces where social distancing was not possible.

It was first imposed in May 2020 after the first wave of the virus.

The announcement came as Sanchez was videotaping regional leaders to discuss ways to reduce the spread of the Omicron variant first identified in southern Africa late last month.

Spain has around 80% of its population of 47 million people vaccinated – one of the highest rates in the world.

Until recently, it had avoided the surge in infections seen elsewhere in Europe, which led to stricter rules.

But the arrival of Omicron has fueled the infections, with a record of nearly 50,000 new cases recorded yesterday, even though hospital admissions and intensive care occupancy remain quite low compared to previous waves of Covid -19.

The coronavirus infection rate in Spain exceeded 500 cases per 100,000 people on Friday, crossing the threshold considered “at very high risk” by the Ministry of Health and having more than doubled since the beginning of December.

Yesterday it stood at 695 cases per 100,000.

Omicron accounts for around 47% of total Covid-19 infections in Spain, according to official data, after increasing by just 3% the week before.

Under Spain’s highly decentralized system of government, the regions are responsible for health policy. Mr Sanchez called today’s meeting to try to coordinate the response to the spike in infections ahead of the Christmas holidays.

The northeastern region of Catalonia, whose capital is Barcelona, ​​is set to be the first Spanish region to re-establish a nighttime curfew.

He asked the courts to allow a series of restrictions, including a nighttime curfew, the closure of nightclubs and the limitation of the capacity of gymnasiums, restaurants and theaters, from Christmas Eve and a duration of 15 days.

In the Madrid region, however, the Conservative government has pledged to keep the hotel sector open during the holiday season.

Spain has been hit hard by the pandemic, recording nearly 89,000 deaths and 5.6 million infections since it began.

Fourth Covid-19 bite needed, according to German Minister of Health

German Health Minister Karl Lauterbach said a fourth vaccination will be needed in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic due to the more contagious Omicron variant.

He said Germany has ordered 80 million doses of a vaccine made by Biontech specifically targeting Omicron and is expected to arrive in April or May.

Germany has also ordered four million doses of the newly approved vaccine Novavax – considered more acceptable to vaccine skeptics – and 11 million doses of the new vaccine Valneva, which is pending market authorization, said Mr Lauterbach.

The Novavax fire will arrive in the country in January, Mr Lauterbach said at a press conference.

“An offensive recall campaign is our most important element in the fight against Omicron,” said the Minister of Health.

Mr Lauterbach supported a general vaccination mandate, saying that without it, it would not be possible to manage the waves of infection to come in the long term.

According to Lothar Wieler, president of the German Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for Infectious Diseases, Omicron will be responsible for most coronavirus infections in Germany within three weeks.

“Christmas should not become the spark that sets off the Omicron fire,” RKI chief Lothar Wieler said at the same press conference, adding that people should limit contact to the bare minimum.

Japan calls on US military to enforce virus rules after core cluster

Japan has urged the US military to adhere to coronavirus testing and quarantine rules as a cluster linked to a US base has reached more than 200 cases.

Cases have nosedived in recent months in Japan, which recorded a relatively low number of 18,300 Covid deaths during the pandemic.

But in recent days, 215 people linked to US base Camp Hansen in Japan’s southern Okinawa region have tested positive, Foreign Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi said.

Mr Hayashi said he had expressed “deep regret” to the commander of US forces in Japan, Lt. Gen. Ricky Rupp, over anti-infection procedures for US military arrivals.

Japan’s borders are closed to almost all foreign nationals. Incoming travelers should get tested before departure and upon arrival, and then self-isolate for two weeks at home or in hotels.

Mr Hayashi, however, said the US military was testing soldiers only three to five days after they land, with newly arrived troops being allowed to roam freely within their base.

“These rules are not in line with Japanese rules,” he told reporters in Tokyo, saying he had been instructed by Prime Minister Fumio Kishida to voice his concerns to LTG Rupp.

It is not known how many in the Okinawa cluster have the rapidly spreading variant of the Omicron virus, which has accounted for nearly three-quarters of new cases in the United States over the past week.

As the US military tightened its rules, Mr Hayashi said he demanded strict enforcement.

LTG Rupp told Hayashi that it took the situation at Camp Hansen seriously and promised to increase testing of those entering Japan, among other measures, according to the foreign minister.

There are approximately 20,000 US Marines in Okinawa, along with thousands of other soldiers from other US military services.

Last year, two US Navy bases in Okinawa – including Camp Hansen – were closed and restrictions imposed on other bases in the region, with local officials criticizing the US military’s containment efforts.

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