Politician – Ramiro Ledesma http://ramiroledesma.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 02:42:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ramiroledesma.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Politician – Ramiro Ledesma http://ramiroledesma.com/ 32 32 Bryce Edwards: Politicians and the Reserve Bank are blamed for a worsening economic crisis https://ramiroledesma.com/bryce-edwards-politicians-and-the-reserve-bank-are-blamed-for-a-worsening-economic-crisis/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 22:30:30 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/bryce-edwards-politicians-and-the-reserve-bank-are-blamed-for-a-worsening-economic-crisis/ The authorities are now clearly in the line of fire for their management of the economy and especially of inflation. Photo/Mark Mitchell OPINION: Will the impending economic recession destroy Labor’s re-election chances? Is the Reserve Bank making it worse? And could a national government do better? These are some of the big political questions floating […]]]>

The authorities are now clearly in the line of fire for their management of the economy and especially of inflation. Photo/Mark Mitchell

OPINION:

Will the impending economic recession destroy Labor’s re-election chances? Is the Reserve Bank making it worse? And could a national government do better? These are some of the big political questions floating around after the full extent of the economy’s predicament was made clear by the Reserve Bank yesterday.

The authorities are now clearly on the line of fire for their management of the economy and especially of inflation. Politicians and officials are rightly under scrutiny as the public’s economic hardship grows and is expected to worsen over the next three years.

The big news yesterday was the unprecedented increase in the Reserve Bank’s official exchange rate, leading to higher interest rates. The Reserve Bank’s intention is to make the public feel poorer and therefore stop spending so much.

Those with large mortgages will be particularly affected – according to calculations, a $500,000 loan will require an additional $12,000 in annual repayments. Many highly indebted homeowners will struggle. Tenants will also be punished, with the costs passed on by landlords in the form of rent increases.

This bad news does not stop there. The Reserve Bank says a lot more pain is on the horizon. They predict the OCR will rise to 5.5% next year, and they predict New Zealand will be in recession for a year from June 2023. Some are now comparing this to the scale of the global financial crisis of 2008.

Not only will real wage growth decline, but the Reserve Bank also says unemployment will skyrocket to 5.7%. Surprisingly, an estimated 130,000 more people will be out of work. And, to make matters worse, the cost of living crisis is set to deepen, with inflation now forecast to be even higher.

As always, the economic pain will not be evenly distributed. The young, the already poor, and new buyers are all about to be severely tested and punished.

Is the Reserve Bank making it worse?

As for the predicted economic recession, there is no doubt that it is by design rather than just a forecast by the Reserve Bank. Governor Adrian Orr said today that the bank was deliberately staging a recession in order to drive down the rate of inflation. He told MPs today that ‘we are deliberately trying to slow overall spending in the economy’. And he called on workers to accept lower wages to help the economy recover.

Reserve Bank Governor Adrian Orr at the monetary policy statement press conference.  Photo/Mark Mitchell
Reserve Bank Governor Adrian Orr at the monetary policy statement press conference. Photo/Mark Mitchell

Of course, yesterday’s headline was the Bank’s decision to raise the official exchange rate by 75 points to 4.25%, which was called “hawkish” by many economists.

In fact, many economists publicly state that such a large increase in the OCR is a mistake and will further harm the economy because it tightens monetary policy too much, which reduces economic activity. For example, Kiwibank economist Jarred Kerr reacted negatively to the rise in OCR, saying, “We are looking at a reserve bank that is committed to lowering inflation, but I think it risks overcook his answer”.

Similarly, Westpac’s chief economist, Michael Gordon, questioned the need for a large increase, and BNZ’s head of research, Stephen Toplis, said his bank would have increased OCR by less. .

Economics professor Robert McCulloch of the University of Auckland also said yesterday that the hike “is probably a gigantic mistake”, saying he would have “recommended a much more modest rate hike”.

McCulloch argues that the Reserve Bank is doing politics and public relations rather than making decisions in the best interests of the country.

According to McCulloch, Adrian Orr opted for a steep increase primarily to avoid criticism of the Bank’s performance: “The Reserve Bank has been deeply stung by criticism…that it has failed to respond to the surge in inflation last year and fell asleep at the wheel.. Now he wants to look tough, talk like he actually cares about inflation and pretend to be really, really serious about the achievement of its objective of 1 to 3%.

McCulloch argues that the Reserve Bank, accused of being too lenient with inflation for too long, is now going too far to correct this: “The Bank is better compared to a drunken driver who blew the economy is now shaking the steering wheel in the opposite direction, but in doing so it overreacts and will end up crushing the car. The car in this story is, of course, the Kiwi economy and everyone with a mortgage.

Another colorful analogy of the direction of the New Zealand economy comes from economics journalist David Hargreaves, who worries that if we don’t see an improvement in inflation soon, “then we’re probably all in a very little boat heading for rapid evolution”. waterway without means of steering. And he concludes his analysis of the Reserve Bank’s latest announcement in a rather ominous way: “As far as the RBNZ is concerned, inflation must be killed. If it will also kill the economy, we will know.

Robertson and Labor under scrutiny

To what extent is Labor responsible for the current economic mess? There is no consensus on this, but commentators are beginning to speculate on the extent of Labor sanction by the electorate when it seeks re-election next year.

Financial journalist Bernard Hickey writes today: ‘The central bank has just made it massively harder for the Labor government to win a third term, which was already in serious doubt. And political journalist Henry Cooke adds sarcastically: “If there’s one thing voters love, it’s recession, high interest rates and inflation – all of it! Cooke says Labour’s road back to re-election ‘got a lot tougher yesterday’ and ‘the Reserve Bank may have just decided the election’.

Herald political reporter Thomas Coughlan believes yesterday’s announcement is something of a turning point, showing that Labour’s economic management has collapsed. He rightly points out that “Labour will have a hard time winning an election in a recession”.

Deputy Prime Minister Grant Robertson.  Photo/Mark Mitchell
Deputy Prime Minister Grant Robertson. Photo/Mark Mitchell

Coughlan explains that Finance Minister Grant Robertson now has a huge headache because there is immense pressure on the government to cut spending in order to bring down inflation. This is not the right time for an election year when Robertson wanted to be able to spend a lot on social policy. Instead, Coughlan suggests Labor will need to present “a parsimonious 2023 budget and election manifesto”.

Stuff political editor Luke Malpass agrees that all economic signs are now very bad for Labour’s re-election: “For Labour, this is potentially dire territory heading into election year – with a poll expected in November”, and “next year should be the perfect climate for a centre-right party to be re-elected”.

Malpass predicts that all sorts of economic pressures will make voters think twice about trusting Labor with their vote. For example, “the now probable specter of nearly 8% mortgage rates on election day next year will give many voters pause”.

In response, Labor will come under pressure to propose big economic changes. “Stable as she goes” will not be an option. Labor may need to re-examine some of its core policies, particularly in areas such as immigration. The role of government policies in blocking immigrant workers from the country is now set as a key area of ​​debate.

Newshub political editor Jenna Lynch is also pessimistic about Labor’s ability to weather the coming economic storm: “A world of pain is coming. They were hoping that this inflation crisis would be short and sharp, but it turns out that Election Day could well be an economic disaster, with the Reserve Bank predicting those dark economic clouds to come at the end of the year. next.

She also reports that Labor is headed for austerity: “Newshub understands that the government is now massively managing its spending and is considering getting rid of some of the goodies rather than the necessities.”

The idea that government is currently contributing to the inflation problem means Labor may feel the need to over-correct this by suddenly pushing the austerity brakes on their spending.

National and Luxon under scrutiny

Despite all the criticism from incumbents, no commentator has much faith in National’s ability to better handle the economic crisis. As Malpass puts it, despite Labor’s problems, “none of this is to say that National is going to have a blast, or even that it offers particularly compelling solutions.”

In fact, National is simply abandoning its own fundamental economic policies in response to escalating economic pain. Yesterday he capitulated on tax cuts, with leader Christopher Luxon signaling that his plans to cut Labour’s top tax rate are now complete.

National Chief Christopher Luxon.  Photo/Mark Mitchell
National Chief Christopher Luxon. Photo/Mark Mitchell

Coughlan explains that the abandonment of the tax cut policy was inevitable, so National took the opportunity to dump an embarrassing policy: “A day of bad news for the government is an ideal day for the opposition buries bad news. In an interview with the Herald this morning, and later after Parliament, Luxon essentially said his policy of scrapping the top 39% tax rate was dead. Politics is expensive, polls terribly expensive, and appeals only to voters who have already [vote] Tory.”

Increasingly, National’s campaign rhetoric is simply that they are “not Labour”. But is it really enough in times of economic recession? Does National have any substantial policies that could help weather the current economic crisis? Even if voters punish Labor for their mismanagement of the economy, there is no indication they should be convinced National would do better.

Dr. Bryce Edwards is a policy analyst in residence at Victoria University of Wellington. He is the director of Democracy Project.
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Do not fight for any politician, Sultan, CAN advise Nigerians https://ramiroledesma.com/do-not-fight-for-any-politician-sultan-can-advise-nigerians/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:09:38 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/do-not-fight-for-any-politician-sultan-can-advise-nigerians/ As the 2023 general elections approach, Muslim and Christian leaders have warned Nigerians against fighting for politicians. the Sultan of Sokoto and General Chairman of the Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs, Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar III; the president of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Archbishop Daniel Okoh, and the founder of Vision Africa, Bishop Sunday […]]]>

As the 2023 general elections approach, Muslim and Christian leaders have warned Nigerians against fighting for politicians.

the Sultan of Sokoto and General Chairman of the Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs, Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar III; the president of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Archbishop Daniel Okoh, and the founder of Vision Africa, Bishop Sunday Onuoha, have implored citizens to instead work for credible candidates in the 2023 polls.

Speaking at an inclusive security dialogue hosted by Global Peace Foundation, Vision Africa and IDF International, the Sultan instead said that by risking their lives for individuals, Nigerians should work for unity and security from the country.

The Sultan, who was represented by the head of the Sultan’s Foundation, Dr Hussein Zakariyya, said that they, the religious leaders, had told their followers not to fight for any politician but to work for the interest of the country.

He said: “For six years now, I have not been able to get to Kaduna by road. This is where I was born. We told our people not to fight for politicians. Don’t fight for anyone. Everyone who fights fights for personal gain.

“Think twice. Think more than yourself before participating in any political chaos. I am also an Ambassador of Peace to the United Nations and we will continue to work for peace”.

For his part, CAN President Bishop Okoh said the world was watching to see if there would be a relatively peaceful transition, or a repeat of the ugly and familiar past.

“And this is where this kind of inclusive and sincere dialogue becomes very timely. As a religious leader, I am hopeful that this ugly history of pre- or post-election violence will not happen again if we all decide to stop the trend with a strategic conversation that appeals to the conscience of the political class.

“Unbridled ambition and cutthroat competition among Nigerian politicians is the major part of the problem. Even people without a coherent political ideology or development agenda of any kind are also engaging in do-or-die politics.

“The other problem is the lack of transparency of the electoral process and the unholy alliance of the security agencies with the political class during the elections. All of this makes the process tense, scary and disenfranchises the weak and feeble-minded. We call on Nigerians to do the right thing and avoid violence,” he said.

For his part, Vision Africa Founder, Bishop Sunday Onuoha, who said they must act quickly to curb electoral violence, added that religious leaders must take a serious part in the 2023 general elections.

His words: “We need to focus on better understanding the root causes of conflict and violence that affect us as a people. We must increase the positive relationship between the Nigerian government and various agitation groups across the country, and encourage a refocus on the importance of universal principles and shared values ​​as the glue of social cohesion and lasting peace.

“As Nigeria charts the course for a new election in 2023, the panacea for an election free of violence and crisis is right here in this hall today!

“Engaged and caring leaders and influencers of politics, who are not shy to acknowledge and understand the deep frustrations of other communities, but rather willing to put up the tent pegs and pave the way for the collective process towards safety and peace in Nigeria.

“We will meet with a cross section of youth organizations in Nigeria, as we recognize and recognize that young people are significant drivers of change at all levels of conflict prevention and peacebuilding.

“Any responsive, inclusive and representative decision-making process that excludes young people lacks sustainability.”

“As the 2023 Nigerian elections approach, youth involvement in conflict prevention and peacebuilding should be a priority, as extremist and dissident groups often seek to recruit new recruits from young people living in desperate conditions or within fractured societies.

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Nepal’s Next Generation Faces Older Politicians in Upcoming Polls https://ramiroledesma.com/nepals-next-generation-faces-older-politicians-in-upcoming-polls/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 04:13:11 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/nepals-next-generation-faces-older-politicians-in-upcoming-polls/ Kathmandu: With just two days left before the crucial federal parliament and provincial assembly polls, Sobita Gautam, a young activist from Nepal, has waged an aggressive door-to-door campaign in her constituency of Kathmandu- 2. Gautam, 27, is running for election to enter the House of Representatives, the lower house of Nepal’s federal parliament, which has […]]]>

Kathmandu: With just two days left before the crucial federal parliament and provincial assembly polls, Sobita Gautam, a young activist from Nepal, has waged an aggressive door-to-door campaign in her constituency of Kathmandu- 2.

Gautam, 27, is running for election to enter the House of Representatives, the lower house of Nepal’s federal parliament, which has 275 members. She is in competition with Onsari Gharti, a leader of the ruling CPN (Maoist Centre) party who is also a former speaker of parliament, and Maniram Phuyal, a leader of the main opposition CPN (UML) party.

Although she is still a baby in Nepal’s mainstream politics and her little-known Rashtriya Swatantra party is struggling to establish itself in mainstream politics, she sees her big prospects in the elections.

Gautam, a lawyer and former television journalist, introduces herself as a youth worker. She says her candidacy represents all those young people who want significant reforms in national politics.

“I believe people will vote for young people this time because they are tired of old politicians and their dirty business under the guise of politics,” Gautam said in a recent TV interview. She believes that youth participation in mainstream politics will accelerate political transformation and social change in the country.

Gautam is among hundreds of young Nepalese trying to enter mainstream politics through elections to the federal parliament and provincial assembly due to be held on November 20. Although young people make up 40% of the country’s total population, their representation at the political-level of manufacturing is minimal.

Nepal is heading for federal parliament and provincial assembly elections for the second time after the country adopted a republican constitution in 2015. The upcoming elections would be another major step in consolidating the democratic republic and federalism.

Sagar Dhakal, another young aspirant, is running for office against none other than the country’s outgoing prime minister, Sher Bahadur Deuba. Dhakal is waging a vigorous door-to-door campaign in the far western district of Dadeldhura, where Deuba has won elections consecutively at least five times. There are reasons why Dhakal decided to show up against Deuba this time. It was 2017, Dhakal went viral after he swapped barbs with Deuba on a talk show hosted by BBC Media Action. Dhakal, the invited participant, asked Prime Minister Deuba why Nepal lacks prime ministers or presidents who graduated from world-renowned universities like Oxford in the UK.

Enraged by Dhakal’s question, Deuba showed erratic behavior. Deuba, the main speaker at the event, gave a blunt answer: “How could we get Oxford University here overnight?” Dhakal was in the national spotlight after this event.

Later, Dhakal went to Oxford to get a master’s degree and returned home. The young man is again in the spotlight as he faces Prime Minister Deuba.

“This is not my constituency, but this is where I am contesting the election against a person who has become prime minister five times,” Dhakal, an independent candidate, was quoted by Al Jazeera as saying.

Dhakal said the young people who aspire to lead national politics should continue to break the hegemony of old politicians with their lofty vision. “In fact, people under 40 should lead mainstream politics,” he said in another interview.

Although the periodic elections are a battle between old and new, conventional and alternative political forces, the upcoming elections in Nepal suggest that people from different walks of life are also in the fray.

Local elections held in May this year may have motivated many young people to run as independents or as representatives of political parties, according to observers.

For example, 32-year-old Balen Sah, a rapper, won the mayoral race in the metropolitan city of Kathmandu as an independent by defeating his powerful rival candidates from the major parties – the Nepalese Congress and the CPN-UML. Similarly, Harka Rai won the race for mayor of Dharan sub-metropolitan city in eastern Nepal while Gopal Hamal became the mayor of Dhangadhi sub-metropolis in far western Nepal. Rai and Hamal were independent candidates.

The rise of independent politicians is seen as a sign that mainstream parties like the Nepalese Congress and CPN-UML are losing their grip on their constituents, observers said.

“Young people are in the fray in this election this time with the firm belief that people are fed up with old politicians and want political and social transformation by removing them from mainstream politics. Recent polls at the local level also suggest that people are frustrated with mainstream politics,” Yuba Nath Lamsal, political commentator and former editor of state daily The Rising Nepal, told India Narrative.

Other popular faces are also in the running by forming different political parties. For example, Ramesh Kharel, a former police officer, is running for election in Kathmandu-1. He founded the Nepal Sushasan Party only last year and fights for good governance and the fight against corruption.

“I believe the old guard should step out of politics and the new should have a chance to lead the country,” said Kharel, who is in electoral competition with Prakash Man Singh of the ruling party and Rabindra Mishra of the Rashtriya party. Prajatantra, during a TV interview last week.

Yug Pathak, another activist, is running for election with CPN UML Chairman KP Sharma Oli is from East Jhapa district in an independent capacity.

According to the Election Commission of Nepal, a total of 360 candidates have filed for 15 seats of member of the House of Representatives in three districts of Kathmandu valley, and among them 128 are independent candidates, representing 35.55% of the number. number of applications. . Similarly, 340 candidates filed for 30 seats in the provincial assembly in these three constituencies. Among them, 119 are independent candidates, or 35%.

According to the commission, a total of 2,412 candidates — 2,187 men and just 225 women — are vying for 165 of the 275 seats in the House of Representatives, the lower house, under the first-past-the-post (FPTP) electoral system. The remaining 110 legislators will be elected under the proportional representation (PR) system.

Read also : In Nepal, the ‘democratic left’ fights ‘regressive’ forces in crucial national elections

(Santosh Ghimire is India Narrative’s Nepal correspondent based in Kathmandu)

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Donald Trump makes his opinion clear on the politician who threatened the Super Bowl https://ramiroledesma.com/donald-trump-makes-his-opinion-clear-on-the-politician-who-threatened-the-super-bowl/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 18:20:16 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/donald-trump-makes-his-opinion-clear-on-the-politician-who-threatened-the-super-bowl/ WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 26: United States President Donald Trump departs Marine One, on the South Lawn of the White House on July 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump golfed with former NFL quarterback Brett Favre this weekend at Trump National Golf Club. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images) Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Former US President […]]]>

WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 26: United States President Donald Trump departs Marine One, on the South Lawn of the White House on July 26, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Trump golfed with former NFL quarterback Brett Favre this weekend at Trump National Golf Club. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

Former US President Donald Trump is backing a candidate who previously threatened the Super Bowl.

Kari Lake, the Republican candidate for governor of Arizona, once threatened to cancel the Super Bowl in his home countryis supported by Trump.

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Ukrainian politician Inna Sovsun attends UC Berkeley event and discusses wartime higher education https://ramiroledesma.com/ukrainian-politician-inna-sovsun-attends-uc-berkeley-event-and-discusses-wartime-higher-education/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 06:09:06 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/ukrainian-politician-inna-sovsun-attends-uc-berkeley-event-and-discusses-wartime-higher-education/ Inna Sovsun, Member of Ukrainian Parliament and former First Deputy Minister of Education and Science, came to UC Berkeley on Thursday to discuss the state of higher education in Ukraine with John Douglass, senior fellow at the Center for Higher Education Studies. Sovsun detailed the damage Russian forces have done to educational institutions since the […]]]>

Inna Sovsun, Member of Ukrainian Parliament and former First Deputy Minister of Education and Science, came to UC Berkeley on Thursday to discuss the state of higher education in Ukraine with John Douglass, senior fellow at the Center for Higher Education Studies.

Sovsun detailed the damage Russian forces have done to educational institutions since the invasion began in February. She noted that 2,739 places of learning have been damaged, of which 333 are completely destroyed.

As a result, many universities in the occupied territories have been relocated, with the majority reopening, according to Sovsun.

“People ask me, ‘Do you study?’ (and) ‘Are there any studies going on?’ In fact, there are. The majority of universities reopened for online classes at the end of March,” Sovsun said at the event. “It was weird, but somehow I could see the logic behind it because people needed a sense of normalcy.”

Despite this, Sovsun noted a “brain drain” problem due to many professors and students leaving the country or devoting their efforts to the war.

Sovsun said that during the event, many female teachers left the country, while many men joined because they are not allowed to leave. She added that this is a complex issue from a “feminist” perspective.

There is also the question of teachers who remained in the occupied territories and who may have cooperated with Russian forces, according to Sovsun. During the event, she said it was something that could come to light if the Russians withdrew from Kherson.

Sovsun noted that the “brain drain” also applies to students. She noted issues regarding students who are currently studying outside Ukraine without indicating whether they will return, at the meeting. Sovsun added that the European Union helps Ukrainian refugees with their education, but does not help those who remain.

To address this, Sovsun suggested introducing more dual degree programs between Ukrainian and international universities.

Sovsun noted that it would also be useful to establish discussion platforms and conferences where Ukrainians and Americans can exchange ideas and collaboratively solve problems such as the reintegration of veterans.

Regarding cooperation between Russian and Ukrainian academic institutions, Sovsun said it is not open to this possibility at the moment.

She added that many do not realize how some in Russia have been influenced by a “hate virus”, adding that she has read many violent comments on social media.

“There should be some sort of collective responsibility, even though it may seem wrong,” Sovsun said at the event. “We bear collective responsibility. My son goes to the air raid shelter three times a day. Did he do anything to deserve this?

Despite its negative effects, the war could allow universities to rebuild and restructure, according to Sovsun.

Sovsun added that she is “rather critical” of Ukraine’s higher education system, with its alleged corruption issues and relics of Soviet influence.

“As terrible as this war is, there may in fact be an opening to promote more reforms within Ukrainian universities,” Sovsun said at the meeting. “I try to see positive opportunities here in terms of institutions that actually understand what their mission is.”

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2023: Nigerian politicians and the only time they listen https://ramiroledesma.com/2023-nigerian-politicians-and-the-only-time-they-listen/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 08:09:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/2023-nigerian-politicians-and-the-only-time-they-listen/ “This election period is the only time Nigerian politicians listen to (the masses). After this period, when they must have been elected, they begin to issue instructions which we must obey, whether we like it or not. We must therefore strive to ask them questions on how they intend to manage the economy of the […]]]>

“This election period is the only time Nigerian politicians listen to (the masses). After this period, when they must have been elected, they begin to issue instructions which we must obey, whether we like it or not. We must therefore strive to ask them questions on how they intend to manage the economy of the country so that the current unemployment rate decreases and the value of the naira against the dollar increases.

This was a submission from Dr. Salihu A. Ajia, a retired but not weary academic, when he appeared on a radio show, “The Perspectives”, on Sobi FM Ilorin on Thursday morning last week .

He opined that as Nigerians set to elect another set of political leaders to rule (ruin, depending on how you feel and view you) over the affairs of the nation, from May 29 of the next year, the socio-economic realities, most of which are direct consequences of the (non-)performance of leavers, bite hard. Inflation was galloping. Unemployment, insecurity and food shortages are commonplace. The decline in the value of the country’s currency, the Naira, among other economic indices is phenomenal. Things are generally not what, or how, an average Nigerian wants them to be, or thinks they should be. A 50kg bag of rice that hovered around twenty-six thousand naira (₦26,000), this time last year is now worth between forty-five thousand naira (₦45,000) and fifty thousand naira (₦50,000) , depending on your location.

The one that is most tragic, because the most dramatic, is the steady and dramatic decline in the value of the Naira. While this is not unexpected for an import-dependent economy like Nigeria’s, it raises serious concerns and requires very urgent attention from those to whom we entrust our socio-economic destiny as a nation. The exchange rate is officially no more than four hundred and forty naira (₦440), but it is close to nine hundred naira (₦900) in the busiest and busiest (parallel) market, created and powered by the systemic system. corruption in our financial ecosystem, managed by the Central Bank of Nigeria (the CBN). The ripple effects of this, on the general price level, are, to say the least, obviously massive.

Another very critical issue is that, most of the oil-producing countries are smiling at the bank, because of the energy crisis in Europe, caused by the war between Russia and Ukraine, but Nigeria, a major oil-producing nation oil – number one in Africa, and number 10 in the world, is insolvent, due to a dodgy fuel subsidy scheme, the benefits of which do not trickle down to the target beneficiaries – the oppressed, socio-economic Nigerians. economically vulnerable. The reason is not far-fetched. Corruption in the country’s oil and gas sector is legendary. Oil theft is rampant in the country, with the complicity of senior government officials – a poorly kept secret. In a country where the government is responsible and reactive, heads would have circulated within the Ministry of Petroleum Resources, and even among the security agencies whose complicity we do not need an FBI, to put themselves in place. But this is Nigeria. “Nothing happens”. More than half of the subsidized products are smuggled to be sold across the border in neighboring West African countries. The NNPC (Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, now Nigerian National Petroleum Company Limited) is a cesspool of corruption. It tells the story of a chronically mismanaged economy and economic opportunity.

Whether we like it or not; whether we admit it or not, food scarcity, the free fall in the value of our currency against major international currencies, insecurity, unemployment, epileptic electricity supply and failing health sector, remain some of the national issues requiring urgent attention from the successor to President Muhammadu Buhari and his fellow travelers come next year. Whether it’s Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu from APC, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar from PDP, Peter Obi from LP, Rabiu Musa Kwankwaso from NNPP, Omoyele Sowore from AAC or Adewole Adebayo from SPD is the only time they listen and are always ready to talk to us (Nigerians), with a good dose of civility as a bonus. Even though we know that all they will say are platitudinal half-truths, as part of the rituals of campaigning in a democratic setting, we must not let it pass without exploiting it. We need to hear from each of them, how they intend to tackle this plethora of issues, if elected. Candidates must be made to engage with us in a way that will make their promises undeniable, by 2026. And, for promises to remain undeniable, they must not come from spokespersons for their parties or their running mate. It should be in an accessible and retrievable document, like a manifesto, written in black and white. We then have to interrogate the documents to see if they are aware of the enormity of the challenges, the lack of resources to solve them, and how and where they would raise the necessary funds, without resorting to “Kao Kudi”. “Economic philosophy of borrowing to finance because we have a debt profile that would take generations to repay. They must be brought to explain to the Nigerians how they intend to go about finding the funds necessary for the execution of the projects aimed at solving these problems. In 21st century Nigeria, it is no longer enough for an aspirant or candidate to tell the masses that “I will do this, I will do that”. They have to tell people where and how they will find the funds to carry out the project they promise people. Nigerians do not deserve another group of leaders whose business actions are to blame and repeat the problems for which they were elected. It’s the only time in a four-year cycle that they seem to be listening. This is why I advised, in one of my recent articles, that in “2023: Nigerians must negotiate from a position of strength”.

Nigerians must not get carried away with their useless slogan war. Whether it’s “Batification”, “Atikulation” or “Obidient”, it shouldn’t be our business. What should be our concern is the ability of the candidates, rooted in their understanding and appreciation of the gravity of our problems, and the political will to tackle them head on. Whether it’s “Unify”, or “Disunify”; “Renewed Hope”, or “Renewed Lack of Hope”, “Dey Give Shishi” or “No Dey Give Shishi”, all Nigerians should care about who is able and willing to ensure the safety of lives and property; stable electricity supply; affordable food prices; affordable and accessible health care service; Job creation; improving the quality of teaching in our schools; fix the plethora of potholes on our highways and open new ones; access to clean and safe water, among others.

Nigerians have witnessed enough battles of slogans, glossy posters and other aesthetic things that don’t really matter to last two lifetimes. Nigerians, especially on social media, need to stop engaging with politicians over frivolous matters, like the color and size of a presidential candidate’s dress – things that have no meaning. direct impact on their well-being. Problems that have nothing to do with the prices of; diesel, PMS, cooking gas, rice, Gari, semo vita, bread, availability of essential medicines at affordable rates in our primary health care centers, stable electricity, safety of life and property, must not do the subject of unnecessary attention. We need to stop dissipating our energies on issues without direct and positive impacts on eliminating potholes on our roads, a functioning railway system, a good learning environment and a stable academic calendar in our institutions. higher education, among others.

The level of hunger in the country does not afford us the luxury of indulging in the frivolities that are currently seen on social media. A man whose house is on fire is to be seen, wandering around, chasing rodents. Rather, we should be concerned with setting a development agenda and the tone of economic/political debates based on issues that would elicit a response from them, how our socio-economic issues will be addressed by whoever emerges as the successor to Buhari among them in the next general report. election.

Dr Ajia’s warning that this is the only time politicians listen, and that Nigerians should not fail to capitalize, to ask them those hard questions on issues that would be used to compare them at the end of their mandate, is a good time.

Abubakar writes from Ilorin. He can be reached at 08051388285 or [email protected]

Opinions expressed by contributors are strictly personal and do not belong to TheCable.

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Reputation of UK politicians at ‘low point’, says standards commissioner | UK News https://ramiroledesma.com/reputation-of-uk-politicians-at-low-point-says-standards-commissioner-uk-news/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/reputation-of-uk-politicians-at-low-point-says-standards-commissioner-uk-news/ The reputation of UK politicians is at a ‘low point’, says the UK’s new Independent Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, as he pledges to defend the ‘vast majority’ of MPs who have pledged to uphold high standards in public life. Daniel Greenberg, who succeeds Kathryn Stone at the end of her five-year term in January, admitted […]]]>

The reputation of UK politicians is at a ‘low point’, says the UK’s new Independent Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, as he pledges to defend the ‘vast majority’ of MPs who have pledged to uphold high standards in public life.

Daniel Greenberg, who succeeds Kathryn Stone at the end of her five-year term in January, admitted that a series of scandals in recent years as well as the turmoil of the past 12 months have damaged Parliament’s reputation.

In his first interview since his appointment, the lawyer and jurist said: “This is a low point in the last decades. It’s definitely a low point in the reputation of politics and politicians… I think politicians as a class have certainly made mistakes.

However, he added: “Reputation is not always earned… We have had some very high profile, high profile and very serious cases of non-compliance with standards over the last five years or so. But in terms of numbers, we have 650 MPs and the vast majority have a strong commitment to high standards in public life.

Greenberg will be the seventh commissioner, employed by parliament rather than the government to safeguard independence, since the post was created in 1995. He has pledged to perform his new role ‘without fear or favour’ and investigate anyone had to be investigated, from backbenchers to prime ministers.

Yet he also hopes to focus on the “positive” side of his job – giving advice and support to MPs and doing outreach to the public. His years of parliamentary experience “put me in a good position to support the best and criticize the worst”, he said.

“I have a deep emotional attachment to the place and what it represents. That’s why I wanted to do [the job], because it bothers me that Parliament has a less impressive reputation than it often deserves. When you see the low level of trust between the public and parliament, politicians at all levels, you want to get involved.

Greenberg, an Orthodox Jew, was born and raised in North West London and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. The 57-year-old has spent 35 years working in Parliament, including drafting and reviewing legislation, and is an adviser on national legislation in the House of Commons.

Her predecessor provoked the ire of Tory MPs when she published a highly critical report on former cabinet minister Owen Paterson over lobbying. Boris Johnson’s involvement in the scandal marked a turning point in the former prime minister’s public image.

Greenberg said he wouldn’t shy away from investigating a politician for wrongdoing, no matter how senior they are. “My role for 35 years has been to give my opinion without fear or favor. I’ve said no, or worse, to ministers time and time again. In that regard, I think it will be a natural continuation of my experience.

He also issued a warning to MPs after Chris Bryant, the chairman of the cross-party standards committee – which monitors their conduct – revealed that some were lobbying on behalf of their colleagues. The new commissioner said he would ‘take this very seriously’ if it happened because it could ‘undermine’ the independence of the system.

Greenberg admitted the number of different standards bodies – including his own, Parliament’s Independent Complaints and Grievances System and the Prime Minister’s Adviser for Ministerial Interests – could be confusing to the public, but said everyone had to be able to “get along” with their own role. .

However, he indicated that Rishi Sunak should continue to fulfill the role of Ethics Counselor which has been empty since Christopher Geidt resigned in Junea day after admitting his “frustration” with Johnson’s role in the Partygate scandal.

“They said they would, and while the considerations for ministerial standards are very different to MPs, it’s a role I look forward to working with. In terms of consistency for the audience, it will be great to have that filled out,” he said.

Greenberg also intends to keep the government on its promise to support plans to crack down on MPs’ second jobs. “Do I have a role to play in making sure it doesn’t end up in the tall grass? Yes, I do,” he said. “This shouldn’t be in the long grass… This is a serious matter as it goes to the heart of reputation and integrity.”

However, he said there was no “single, simple answer” to the question of whether MPs should have outside interests. “There is value in members having ongoing experience outside of the Chamber – and there are dangers in members having too many or conflicting roles outside of the Chamber. It’s a balance that has to be found. »

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Kevin McCarthy the kind of politician who lets democracy die https://ramiroledesma.com/kevin-mccarthy-the-kind-of-politician-who-lets-democracy-die/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 10:00:05 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/kevin-mccarthy-the-kind-of-politician-who-lets-democracy-die/ For the editor: It should be obvious to anyone who thinks clearly about what House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield) stands for, the quest for his own political power, whatever the cost to the nation. He may be good at fundraising and good humor for ordinary people, but shame on those who fall for this […]]]>

For the editor: It should be obvious to anyone who thinks clearly about what House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Bakersfield) stands for, the quest for his own political power, whatever the cost to the nation. He may be good at fundraising and good humor for ordinary people, but shame on those who fall for this clever political ruse while failing to recognize the harm it does to our democracy. (“Ambition keeps him loyal to Donald Trump. But what does Kevin McCarthy represent?October 27)

McCarthy said in one of his speeches that “Biden has launched an assault on the soul of America.” McCarthy has been a willing participant in the Republican assault on the American soul for years. He represents the kind of lying, self-serving political operative most Americans have always said they despise. Even that contempt gave way to tribal loyalty and truth denial in the Republican base.

McCarthy and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) may hold their party factions together, but they fail to set standards of integrity and decency for the nation. Unless their constituents and the vast majority of voters reject these corrupt politicians, our experiment in democracy is doomed, and soon.

TR Jahns, Hemet

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For the editor: Shame on the Times for running a front-page caption that calls McCarthy “probably the next speaker in the House.” With that, the Times has set its sights on other mainstream media that can potentially have a corrosive effect on voter turnout by making such assumptions.

It also ignores the fact that most registered voters are either women, youth, or people of color, most of whom are quite unhappy with what the Republican Party stands for (or doesn’t stand for). I remember Yogi Berra’s famous words, “It’s not over until it’s over.”

I also note that this “potential leader” with 18 years in Congress did not even respond to a Times request to be interviewed for this article. It’s not hard to understand from a man who hasn’t been associated with any historic legislation but now wants to lead a rudderless party.

Joe Grauman, Los Angeles

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For the editor: Gospel of Mark, chapter 8, verse 36: “For what use is it for a man to gain the whole world and lose his soul?

Too bad the Republican Party doesn’t have some sort of religious foundation — like, say, the evangelical movement — that would give it some insight into morality.

Larry Markes, Hollywood

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For the editor: Your article shows how McCarthy may have once been qualified to be Speaker of the House, but now he’s someone whose only priority is to become Speaker. His Faustian bargain will drive the House into the executive branch if former President Trump wins re-election.

The House would not be part of a separate branch of government; he would not seek to monitor Trump’s actions; it would simply act to allow Trump.

With Trump clearly a man of autocratic tendencies who sees democracy as an obstacle, McCarthy may well be inviting the fox into the henhouse.

Bruce N. Miller, Playa del Rey

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Ex-British politician criticizes media framing of Jackson, Mississippi, water crisis https://ramiroledesma.com/ex-british-politician-criticizes-media-framing-of-jackson-mississippi-water-crisis/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 22:40:25 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/ex-british-politician-criticizes-media-framing-of-jackson-mississippi-water-crisis/ As the causes of Jackson’s summer water crisis are pointed out, Mississippia proponent of the free market and individual freedom examines how local and national media coverage concocted two culprits – racism and climate change – to fit a narrative that denigrates the state while downplaying what he said was the real one reason: incompetence. […]]]>

As the causes of Jackson’s summer water crisis are pointed out, Mississippia proponent of the free market and individual freedom examines how local and national media coverage concocted two culprits – racism and climate change – to fit a narrative that denigrates the state while downplaying what he said was the real one reason: incompetence.

For Douglas Carswell, President and CEO of Mississippi Center for Public Policy (MCPP)—a nonprofit that advocates for low taxes, light regulation, higher education standards, and American exceptionalism—the gap between the media narrative and what Jacksonians saw from their own eyes has become a significant revival. appeal to the state capital.

Douglas Carwell. (Courtesy of Douglas Carswell)

“Every time something goes wrong in Mississippi, the media will attribute it to events that happened 50 to 150 years ago to say it’s all a consequence of white racism,” Carswell told The Epoch. Times. “It’s a ready-made model that reporters dust off every time Mississippi pops up, but I think the water crisis was a tipping point for this narrative because ordinary Mississippians got to see through themselves how ridiculous it really was.”

National and local media platforms blamed the water crisis on systematic racism within the majority-black city. Some reports have been dead wrong in stating outright that the city has run out of water due to climate change, when, as Carswell pointed out, Jackson has one of the largest reservoirs in the southern United States.

“The Romans successfully mastered the technology of putting water through pipes to supply a city with fresh water 2,000 years ago,” Carswell said. “There’s no excuse for Jackson not mastering this technology today. It’s incompetence, and the folks at Jackson can see it.

“Environmental Justice and Divestment”

While Carswell claims the city government’s mismanagement is transparent, the Mississippi chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) alleged that the Republican Governor. Tate Reeves divested funds from Jackson that could have been used to fix the problem.

The NAACP called on the newly formed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Environmental Justice and External Civil Rights to investigate the matter, indicating in its letter to Reeves“We have watched closely Jackson’s long history of getting less than his fair share of public funding from the Mississippi state budget and at times being denied funding when it was deserved.”

The NAACP filed a complaint with the EPA under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, bolstering the claim that the water crisis was caused by racial discrimination.

The External Environmental Justice and Civil Rights Office did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the investigation.

On October 17, Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), who is chairman of the Homeland Security Committee and chairman of the U.S. House Select Committee on the Jan. 6 attack, launched his own investigation into state spending, asking to Reeves with data on how he plans to distribute American Rescue Plan Act and Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding.

President Joe Biden has pledged millions to fight “structural racism”, which has led to the appearance of equity, diversity and inclusion departments in government agencies.

Jackson Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba said in a statement from the city“We know that the state of Jackson’s water system did not happen overnight, but is due to decades of disinvestment in the city’s infrastructure.”

However, many Jackson residents have been watching for years and point to the city government’s underinvestment in its water infrastructure, which has deprived 150,000 citizens of clean drinking water.

According to Reeves in an October 17 Press release“Throughout this emergency, we had to regularly supply chemicals, workers and materials for the city because they were unable to do so.”

Reeves added that the state has “poured millions of taxpayer dollars from every county into this effort to save the city from a crisis of incompetence.”

On October 20, in a traditional turkey forgiveness ceremony to support a campaign to raise money for families in need for Thanksgiving, Reeves responded (the discussion from 2 p.m.) a question from a reporter about problems with the city’s water system.

“The mayor went on national television and blamed it on a lot of things,” Reeves said. “But what we have proven over the past 52 days is that the water struggles in Jackson were specific to the incompetence of this administration.”

The state stepped in on Aug. 29, Reeves said, and established a unified command structure, naming both the Department of Health and the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency as leaders.

Within 72 hours Jackson’s water was restored, Reeves said, and the boiled water advisory was lifted 15 days later.

“Operating running water systems isn’t that difficult,” Reeves said.

In his 19 years in office, with more than 1,100 water systems in the state, Reeves said it was the only time he had to sign an emergency proclamation to ensure the water was delivered to the city.

“grotesque incompetence”

Carswell said much of the problem stemmed from a simple failure to bill its citizens.

“In 2017, Jackson’s water billing system collected $61 million in revenue, and the city’s water system operating costs were approximately $54 million,” Carswell said. “This left a healthy surplus that the relevant management could have allocated to cover maintenance costs.”

In 2022, the amount of revenue collected will likely be closer to $40 million, Carswell said, “well below running costs.”

“Not only is there no surplus to spend on maintenance, but there also doesn’t seem to have been much maintenance even when there was a surplus,” Carswell said. “How on earth does a municipal water board manage to lose almost a third of its revenue in the space of five years?”

In any city, water is what Carswell called a “cash cow” because it has a captive market.

“Citizens are billed and they have to submit a check to the city government,” Carswell explained. “What Jackson did was he monstrously failed to charge people.”

Several years ago, the city government contracted an engineering firm to implement a new billing system, Carswell said, which resulted in the company being sued for $89 million. , consequently leaving more money to spend on the city’s lawyers than on improving the city’s water. system.

“If a private company doesn’t bill a third of its customers, it will go bankrupt,” Carswell said. “We’re here in Jackson with the authorities failing to generate a third of its revenue because they couldn’t get their act together and issue bills.”

In addition to a billing failure, the city did not have qualified personnel to manage the water facilities, he said.

“The state has repeatedly offered to help, and those offers have been ignored,” Carswell added. “Eventually things got so bad that the state had to step in and take half the cost and fix things.”

After federal and state governments intervened, the total bill came to less than $200,000, he said.

“It was a miniscule amount of money to fix a problem that was largely caused by the grotesque incompetence of Jackson’s civic leaders,” Carswell said.

The City of Jackson did not respond to The Epoch Times request for comment.

“Stunning the Mississippi”

“Anyone in Jackson could see the incompetence, which is why I think it was an important moment when people could for the first time in a long time honestly assess the cause of public policy in the state without constantly being beaten over the head by reporters with an agenda and a nonsensical narrative,” Carswell said.

It’s not just national reporters with no ties to the state who engage in the reprimand, but also local reporters, he said.

“It’s almost like some of the reporters who write for these newspapers are trying to show the world that they’re somehow sophisticated by dumbing down Mississippi,” Carswell said.

An example of Carswell’s statement might be how a local media outlet framed Reeves’ response to the reporter’s question at the turkey forgiveness ceremony as a rant, omitting the part about the reporter asking the question, which which implies that Reeves – unsolicited – launched a tirade.

As a former Member of Parliament from the United Kingdom (UK) for 12 years, who came to Mississippi not only with an outward view but also with a love of the state, Carswell said it was unfortunate.

“I think it’s one of the most wonderful places in America, and there’s nowhere I’d rather live,” he said. “Yet some of these reporters who write for Mississippi media seem to think their success can be measured by how often they hit their own state.”

Carswell’s effort as a politician in the UK was to advocate for Britain’s exit (also known as Brexit) from the European Union which took place in 2020, he said.

“Once I realized what I wanted to do, I quit,” he said. “I didn’t want to play politics to find another excuse to live at taxpayers’ expense.

Now in Mississippi where he is president of the MCPP, Carswell said he continues to champion what he calls American exceptionalism, which is often mistranslated as racism in Marxist ideologies such as critical race theory ( CRT).

The MCPP drafted a bill that caught on and was signed by Reeves.

The bill prohibits the teaching of divisive and racist concepts found in the CRT that promote the idea that one race is inherently superior or inferior to the other.

“A Sublime Legacy”

For Carswell, America – including the state of Mississippi – is not an archaic paradigm of racism waning in a shadow of irrelevance, but a beacon of freedom for the rest of the world that is not deprived of its full potential only through a lack of vision.

“The reason we live and work in air-conditioned rooms instead of mud huts is because of decisions made in a Philadelphia courthouse in 1787, and we need to make sure the next generation of Americans appreciates that. sublime legacy because, if they forget about it, America will become just a giant version of California,” he said. “It will be a disaster not only for the Republic but also for the free world.”

Matt McGregor

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Matt McGregor covers news and features across the United States. Send him your story ideas: matt.mcgregor@epochtimes.us

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Norah Bosibori: City politician says overconfidence cost Raila Odinga’s presidency in August https://ramiroledesma.com/norah-bosibori-city-politician-says-overconfidence-cost-raila-odingas-presidency-in-august/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 10:57:25 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/norah-bosibori-city-politician-says-overconfidence-cost-raila-odingas-presidency-in-august/ Nairobi-based politician Norah Bosibori has sensationally accused the Azimio La Umoja secretariat of being overconfident. The former aspiring Dagoretti North MP says the team’s main loss was underestimating their main opponents in the Kenya Alliance Kwanza. Bosibori said Azimio’s management had no plan and was waiting for the “deep state” to take over the presidency. […]]]>

Nairobi-based politician Norah Bosibori has sensationally accused the Azimio La Umoja secretariat of being overconfident.

The former aspiring Dagoretti North MP says the team’s main loss was underestimating their main opponents in the Kenya Alliance Kwanza.

Bosibori said Azimio’s management had no plan and was waiting for the “deep state” to take over the presidency.

She hinted that the coalition of parties did not have a clear roadmap to land the presidency early on.

“We were just waiting for the system to work for us. Their strategy failed them very much if they had any strategy at all. I couldn’t see any concrete plan for the presidential election. There were too many centers of power and sabotage within. There was no clear roadmap on what to do to win a presidential election. Why should we get our hands dirty when everything has been settled by the state,” the politician said.

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No strategic commitment

She further claimed that the coalition offices have been turned into clubs where members meet for tea.

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Bosibori explained that his efforts to establish a data center for the party were ignored by the coalition leadership.

“I can’t leave my house to go and sit and have tea. Basically, all the offices that ODM and Azimio ran were centers where people could have tea and bread and laugh before going home “Nothing concrete was done in this framework. I didn’t see any fruitful engagement. We used to go to the orange house, no strategic engagement and no plan,” she added.

Source: TUKO.co.ke

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