Philosopher – Ramiro Ledesma http://ramiroledesma.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:39:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ramiroledesma.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Philosopher – Ramiro Ledesma http://ramiroledesma.com/ 32 32 Midterm election results reflect the hodgepodge of American voters, not the endorsement or repudiation of any candidate or party’s agenda https://ramiroledesma.com/midterm-election-results-reflect-the-hodgepodge-of-american-voters-not-the-endorsement-or-repudiation-of-any-candidate-or-partys-agenda/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:12:54 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/midterm-election-results-reflect-the-hodgepodge-of-american-voters-not-the-endorsement-or-repudiation-of-any-candidate-or-partys-agenda/ (The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of news, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.) Robert B. Talisse, Vanderbilt University (THE CONVERSATION) The results of the US midterm elections came as a shock to many. The incumbent president’s party typically suffers significant losses in the House, Senate, and gubernatorial races in the first midterm election […]]]>

(The Conversation is an independent, nonprofit source of news, analysis, and commentary from academic experts.)

Robert B. Talisse, Vanderbilt University

(THE CONVERSATION) The results of the US midterm elections came as a shock to many. The incumbent president’s party typically suffers significant losses in the House, Senate, and gubernatorial races in the first midterm election of a president’s term. Multiple projections leading up to Election Day speculated that a “red wave” — at one point turning into a “red tsunami” — of massive Republican gains across the Electoral Board would overwhelm Democrats.

Still, it was clear by the end of Election Day that Democrats had performed much better than expected. The “red wave” never materialized. Republican gains in the House were meager. Democrats maintained control of the Senate by flipping Pennsylvania and winning close races elsewhere.

The success of the Democrats goes against a long-standing trend in American politics. The president’s popularity is often seen by pollsters and analysts as a key indicator of his party’s medium-term prospects. Biden’s approval rating has been low throughout his presidency. On election day, his unpopularity was comparable to that of previous presidents who suffered substantial midterm losses. Current polls show 57% of Americans disapprove of Biden and 70% say the country is on the wrong track. Additionally, Americans trust the GOP more than Democrats to handle important issues like inflation, crime, and unemployment. Still, the Democrats won a surprise victory — not losing as much as expected.

What happened?

As a political philosopher who studies democracy and partisanship, I can say that there is no simple explanation for midterms, despite many that have already been declared, published or aired.

Elections are complex and citizens are complicated. Voters adopt a range of priorities, they have different levels of information about their options, and they are motivated by different concerns.

Some data suggests that citizens have very different ideas about what it means to vote. Some see the vote as a show of support for one’s party, others see it as the recording of one’s wishes, and some see their vote as the expression of a judgment on the common good. It is plausible that many citizens believe that they mainly vote against candidates they dislike rather than favorite candidates.

So, while politicians and pundits like to say that elections express the “will of the people”, in reality, this is not the case. Taken as a whole, the electorate is too hodgepodge to have a will of its own.

There is no big picture

Needless to say, Democrats will interpret the results as evidence that their policy agenda is widely embraced by the American people. Meanwhile, Republicans will be looking for an explanation for how their message failed to reach voters.

Digging deeper, political commentators offered several interpretations, claiming that the midterm elections boiled down to one essential factor, such as abortion, immigration, affirmation of democracy itself, repudiation of MAGA republicanism and the high turnout of Gen Z voters.

These explanations have their merit. But the diversity of ideas, impulses and dispositions that voters bring to elections makes the overall analysis of elections problematic.

Even when a majority claims in a poll that a specific issue is “very important,” it is not clear that people agree on anything beyond that description. People have different views on what makes an issue important. Likewise, two citizens who vote for the same candidate may not have much else in common. Consider it likely that voters who “somewhat disapprove” of Biden could have swung many races in favor of the Democrats.

It is not that democracy fails to discern the will of the people, but rather that there is no collective will to express. There is only a mess of entries, a counting procedure and a result. Therefore, the idea that the outcome of a large-scale election can amount to an “endorsement” or a “repudiation” of a candidate or party platform is largely a myth.

That doesn’t mean mid-term results don’t make sense. Democracy remains the government of the people, by and for the people. Elections are instruments through which citizens have a say in political decision-making.

Although electoral victories cannot plausibly be seen as an endorsement of the victor’s ideas, elections still play a crucial role in constraining and directing office holders. In other words, elections simply serve as a popular check on government.

Partisan Identity Rules

There remains the question of the meaning of midterms. Here is my only lesson: as I said earlier, American democracy today is driven by partisan identity rather than politics. Elections are therefore not won by changing the minds of undecided voters, but by mobilizing the base of the party.

Strong data shows that negative emotions like anger and resentment are reliable and powerful motivators of political behavior. Candidates capable of stoking the concerns of the party base are favoured, while bridge builders and cooperators are pushed aside.

These dynamics partly explain the success of MAGA candidates, aligned with former President Donald Trump, in the GOP primaries. However, the strategy of playing at the grassroots comes at a cost in general elections, especially when voters view the party core as a significant threat to democracy.

Furthermore, hoping to appease their MAGA contingent, the mainstream GOP has declined to voice strong opposition to Trump’s campaign lies and appears to disregard the work of the House Jan. 6 committee. The Republican Party itself is therefore associated with MAGA extremism, and this association is at the center of anger and outrage among non-Republican voters.

The Democrats’ midterm success likely has less to do with President Biden’s agenda than with their willingness to uphold familiar Democratic values.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/midterm-election-results-reflect-the-hodgepodge-of-us-voters-not-the-endorsement-or-repudiation-of-a-candidates-or-partys-agenda-194010.

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What happens to volunteering with the hospice https://ramiroledesma.com/what-happens-to-volunteering-with-the-hospice/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:13:16 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/what-happens-to-volunteering-with-the-hospice/ For nearly a year, Elaine Santiago has provided companionship to her client, Ann*, who is over 90 and suffers from heart failure. Santiago works as a volunteer for Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice in Milford. “I was always looking for things she liked. She liked fresh flowers. And I asked a lot of questions: What kind […]]]>

For nearly a year, Elaine Santiago has provided companionship to her client, Ann*, who is over 90 and suffers from heart failure. Santiago works as a volunteer for Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice in Milford.

“I was always looking for things she liked. She liked fresh flowers. And I asked a lot of questions: What kind of books do you like? Do you want me to read you? It’s a very social person and she mostly wanted to talk,” Santiago said.

Santiago has a day job answering medical inquiries for a pharmaceutical company. She sees her client once a week for two hours.

They talk and laugh and have a snack together. Ann loves Dunkin Donuts coffee and crullers, which Santiago buys and shares with her. Ann always says how good they taste.

Sometimes Ann would say she was tired and Santiago would ask “Do you want me to go?” “Oh no!” she would answer. She never remembered Elaine’s name; she had to look at her name tag. When Elaine took her in a wheelchair to the dining room, the woman’s table companions asked, “Who is that?” “Ann looked at me and turned to them and said, ‘She’s an assistant that I liked,'” Santiago recalled with a laugh.

Santiago also did little things; watering her plant, tending to flowers and charging her phone.

“Ann was saying something and I was finding something to add about it and teasing her a bit and she loved it,” Santiago said. Ann had a sense of humor; “Kissable” was printed on one of her shirts and Ann had told another visitor it was her “evening shirt”.

Santiago went to the University of Pennsylvania and met her husband Leo there. While living in Philadelphia, she volunteered at an animal shelter. She showed very early on her willingness to do whatever it took to make things better. She would ask the staff, “How can I help? And they were like, “Do you mind doing the laundry?” and she was like, “No, where is it?”

The couple bought a summer house in Milford in 1998 and moved there full time in 2008. Santiago cared for her husband for 15 months as he died of colorectal cancer. She then took a “Sacred Passage Doula” course** with the Conscious Dying Institute. End-of-life Doulas are frontline caregivers who provide non-medical, emotional, and spiritual support to families and patients during critical illness and the dying process. They fill the gaps in care before, near and during death.

What do volunteers get from their work? “A feeling of helping; selflessness. Do something for someone and not get paid,” Santiago said. It is rewarding; you feel you are making a difference.

Last week was the last time Santiago would see Ann; she was leaving the state to be closer to her family. It was an abrupt and unexpected turn of events. “When I found out she was moving; I became sad and went through a kind of grieving process,” Santiago said. “And I was like, ‘Why are you sad?'”

“Things change over time and you have to accept that. I’m losing her, but I’m happy for her,” Santiago said. “Now her family can visit her often and that’s what she’s focusing on. I think she might want to enjoy her last vacation with her family.

*Name changed to protect privacy.

Why volunteer?

“What is the essence of life? Serve others and do good,” said the Greek philosopher Aristotle. Volunteers help not only individuals but also organizations that could not exist without them. And the volunteers themselves can reap many rewards. Karen Ann Quinlan’s site mentions them: Most people who volunteer report that the joy and satisfaction that comes with giving back far outweighs the effort put into it.

Volunteering can lead to learning new skills. Volunteering can help you get out of yourself and take on new challenges. Volunteering helps you meet new people. Volunteering makes you feel useful. Volunteering can create new contacts, which can help your business, career or social life.

Additionally, according to mayoclinichealthsystem.org › 3-health-ben: Volunteering increases social interaction and helps build a support system based on common interests. Volunteering reduces stress and increases positive, relaxed feelings by releasing dopamine. By spending time in service to others, volunteers report feeling a sense of meaning and appreciation, both given and received, which can have a stress-reducing effect.

Older volunteers experience greater increases in life satisfaction and self-esteem. Voluntary activities allow people to move and think at the same time. Research has found that volunteering provides physical and mental health benefits and has shown that volunteering leads to lower rates of depression and anxiety, especially among people aged 65 and over. Thank you to those who give to others.

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Tour veteran unloads on fear and retirement https://ramiroledesma.com/tour-veteran-unloads-on-fear-and-retirement/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 18:24:25 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/tour-veteran-unloads-on-fear-and-retirement/ By: Dylan Dethier November 19, 2022 Kevin Streelman is in the running at the RSM Classic. Getty Images Kevin Streelman is 44 years old. He played his first PGA Tour event in 2003. And on Friday, competing in the Classic RSMhe talked about some of the things he learned over the next two decades. Sometimes […]]]>

Kevin Streelman is in the running at the RSM Classic.

Getty Images

Kevin Streelman is 44 years old. He played his first PGA Tour event in 2003. And on Friday, competing in the Classic RSMhe talked about some of the things he learned over the next two decades.

Sometimes we associate youth with aggression and age with caution. It’s not, says Streelman.

“You have week after week here and you just have to attack. That’s what I tell these kids,” he said. He was specifically referring to Joel Dahmen, also in the RSM mix, who spoke earlier Friday about playing with fear. Streelman understands fear but said the key to longevity on the Tour is learning from that fear. Exploit it. Look him down.

“When you have the chance to do something big here, you have to go,” he said. “It’s tough sometimes because we’re playing for a lot of money and there’s a lot of FedEx points and you’re like, maybe second place, third place isn’t so bad.”

Streelman cautions against this kind of over-safe thinking.

“I say to kids like me, 420 events in my career, you don’t remember like third places, fifths. You remember wins or you remember losses and when you were on the hunt. This is what we live for, this is what we live for as athletes. I just encourage them when you have a chance, go out there and see what happens and be okay with it in the end.

It’s not always that easy, of course. The reason sports are interesting is the possibility of failure. Every athlete is afraid of failure, and in golf there’s a lot of time to reflect. Doubt. To fear.

Streelman cited a lesson he learned from his caddy in 2013 at the Tampa Bay Championship (now Valspar). He held a two-shot lead on the 18th tee and wondered if he should lie down with 3 or 5 woods. His caddy AJ Montecinos didn’t have it.

“He looks at me – I hadn’t missed a fairway all day – and he says, ‘You’re ripping
that fucking driver on the fairway.

Streelman came forward, hit the driver on the fairway, hit the corner of the green and won the tournament. Lesson learned.

“It’s a fine line between that trust and fear. Sometimes we need help, sometimes it just comes,” Streelman added. “But you don’t tend to play weekends too long if you play with too much fear.”

He attributed this attitude to his long tenure on the Tour. That tenure has also been lucrative: Streelman ranks 69th on the PGA Tour’s career earning list with just over $25 million. But he wonders about the end of this career even as he fights against it. He knows he can’t keep up with the young bombers – he ranked 131st in driving distance last season – but he still has plenty of play too.

“I had a great conversation with my wife, Courtney,” he said. “We went on a date a few weeks ago and I said to her: if you are ready for me to be home, let me know. I’m ready. She is having a hard time, all of our wives are having a hard time with our children, an 8 and 6 year old. I’m on the road, next week we’re gone, my fourth straight week gone. So I miss, Sophie has one 101 Dalmatians musical today and tomorrow that I miss, that kills me. But she has to prepare her for this. She has to bring Rhett to football. She must be a mom.

“I said, if you need help, you gave up the last 20 years of your life for me and if you’re ready, I’m ready. She’s like no, I want you there, you’re still fine. I said okay. While I’m here, I’m going to do my best to be my best. »

Streelman’s best self was very good in two sets at RSM. He opened with 68 and then shot a second-round 64 in which he hit 17 of 18 greens in regulation time and birdied seven. He recognized this as a beauty of golf. And he quoted the philosopher Toby Keith.

“The great thing with our sport, you can always have a magical week. It can happen,” he said. “It’s like, maybe not as good as before, but I’m as good as I was. ‘before. It’s like the line.

Other sports tell you when much more clearly. Streelman has a lot of exposure with these athletes, both playing alongside them at home in Scottsdale and partnering with former Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald at Pebble Beach.

“I asked him the same question and he said, I knew. They had. It’s like a very thin line. He lost a small step and wasn’t as quick as the younger guys and it was over. But that’s not quite it with us. Unless some of us want it to be, I think it’s just not because one magic week of putting and hitting the ball can change everything. Then you start chasing him again after that. Golf is a crazy and stupid sport sometimes.

Crazy stupid sport. Streelman will continue to pursue, hoping this week can change everything. And if not this week, maybe next.

Dylan Dethier

Dylan Dethier

Golf.com Editor

Dylan Dethier is Senior Editor for GOLF Magazine/GOLF.com. The native of Williamstown, Mass. joined GOLF in 2017 after two years of struggling on the mini-laps. Dethier is a graduate of Williams College, where he majored in English, and is the author of 18 in Americawhich details the year he spent as an 18-year-old living off his car and playing a round of golf in every state.

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World Philosophy Day 2022 | Quotes to share, theme and story of the day https://ramiroledesma.com/world-philosophy-day-2022-quotes-to-share-theme-and-story-of-the-day/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 04:26:18 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/world-philosophy-day-2022-quotes-to-share-theme-and-story-of-the-day/ World Philosophy Day 2022 World Philosophy Day is celebrated every year on the third Thursday of November. The day was proclaimed by UNESCO and was first celebrated on November 21, 2022. Philosophy is the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when viewed as an academic discipline. It is also a […]]]>

World Philosophy Day 2022

World Philosophy Day is celebrated every year on the third Thursday of November. The day was proclaimed by UNESCO and was first celebrated on November 21, 2022.

Philosophy is the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when viewed as an academic discipline. It is also a theory or attitude that serves as a guiding principle for behavior.

This is why each year UNESCO highlights the enduring value of the subject for the development of human thought, for each culture and for each individual. The day aims to raise awareness of philosophy and its crucial role in understanding our past, present and future.

The day was first celebrated in 2002, and in 2005 UNESCO found it necessary to institutionalize the celebration of philosophical reflection around the world.

In 2007, UNESCO published a 726-page multilingual program and meeting document on the Proceedings of the General Conference, 33rd session Paris, 2005. It was to commemorate World Philosophy Day and highlight its importance to young people and as a discipline.

theme of the year

A theme is added to World Philosophy Day each year so that the focus remains on a particular topic of importance. The theme of World Philosophy Day 2022 is “The Human of the Future”. This year, UNESCO and Le Fresnoy – Studio National des Arts Contemporains organized a symposium and an exhibition.

The event will have been developed around the themes of natural sciences (the non-human), post-colonialism, technological issues, gender, waste, fictitious inventions and anthropology.

Quotes to share

“Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.” – Frank Zappa

“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe. -Albert Einstein

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.” -Mahatma Gandhi

“Without music life would be a mistake.” – Friedrich Nietzsche, Twilight of the Idols

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. In fact, it’s the only thing that ever existed. -Margaret Mead

“You speak when you cease to be at peace with your thoughts.” – Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet

“We must dare to be ourselves, however scary or strange our selves may be.” -May Sarton

“It’s hard enough to remember my opinions, without also remembering the reasons behind them!” -Friedrich Nietzsche

“Do not be afraid to be eccentric in your opinions, for any opinion now accepted was once eccentric.” -Bertrand Russell

“Even by teaching, men learn” – Seneca the Younger

“There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance” – Socrates

“If God didn’t exist, he would have to be invented” – Voltaire

“It is patently absurd; but he who wants to become a philosopher must learn not to be frightened by absurdities” – Bertrand Russell

“There is only one thing you can count on a philosopher to do, and that is to contradict other philosophers” – William James

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit” – Aristotle

“Only one man ever understood me, and he didn’t understand me” – GWF Hegel

“The mind is provided with ideas by experience alone” – John Locke

“Life must be understood upside down. But it has to be experienced first” – Søren Kierkegaard

“Science is what you know. Philosophy is what you don’t know” – Bertrand Russell

“Is man simply a mistake of God? Or is God just a mistake of man? -Friedrich Nietzsche

“I would never die for my beliefs because I could be wrong” – Bertrand Russell

“Religion is the sign of the oppressed…it is the opium of the people” – Karl Marx

“Happiness is the greatest good” – Aristotle

“If men were born free, they would have, as long as they remained free, no conception of good and evil” – Baruch Spinoza

“Man is born free, but everywhere is chained” – Jean-Jacques Rousseau

“Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest” – Denis Diderot

“If you want to be a true seeker of truth, you must at least once in your life doubt, as much as possible, of all things” – René

Descartes

“Happiness lies in virtuous activity, and perfect happiness lies in the best activity, which is contemplative” – ​​Aristotle

“I can control my passions and emotions if I can understand their nature” – Spinoza

“Philosophers have hitherto only interpreted the world in various ways; the goal, however, is to change it” – Karl Marx

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Slavoj Žižek discusses human nature and science in a lecture on campus https://ramiroledesma.com/slavoj-zizek-discusses-human-nature-and-science-in-a-lecture-on-campus/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/slavoj-zizek-discusses-human-nature-and-science-in-a-lecture-on-campus/ Renowned Slovenian philosopher and public intellectual Slavoj Žižek campus visited at the beginning of this month. His talk drew around 200 community members, as McCosh Hall 46 was packed and attendees streamed out of the room. “I am especially delighted to welcome a speaker who needs no introduction. Tonight’s turnout is proof enough of that,” […]]]>

Renowned Slovenian philosopher and public intellectual Slavoj Žižek campus visited at the beginning of this month. His talk drew around 200 community members, as McCosh Hall 46 was packed and attendees streamed out of the room.

“I am especially delighted to welcome a speaker who needs no introduction. Tonight’s turnout is proof enough of that,” graduate student Florian Endres said at the event.

Endres introduced Žižek as “Senior Researcher at the Institute of Sociology and Philosophy at the University of Ljubljana, Global Distinguished Professor of German at New York University and International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for Humanities in London”.

At the top of the conference, Žižek discussed the relationship between gender and freedom.

“Your sexual identity is a matter of – in a deep sense – free choice, but the notion of freedom here is very radical,” he said. “It’s a very traumatic thing, involving a lot of physical pain, surgery, trauma, etc.”

“It’s not a simple freedom of choice. It’s really something like an unconscious choice,” he said. “In our unconscious we are much freer than in our conscious self-awareness. The most radical choices, we experience them as a necessity.

Žižek then pivoted the lecture towards the superego, Sigmund Freud’s idea of ​​the ethics and morals component of human personality.

“I want to start with the superego paradox noted long ago by Freud: the more we obey the command of the superego, the guilt we feel,” he said. “Enjoyment is a real impossible. You can never reach it fully and this failure makes us feel guilty.

Žižek explained how ideological individuality prevents successful action, especially regarding the climate.

“What have you done today to repay your debt to nature? Have you put all newspapers in the correct recycling bin? ” He asked. “Following the injunctions to recycle, etc., ultimately means that I follow rituals that allow me to put off doing something that would really tackle the causes of the ecological crisis.

“Let me go even further here: the fire in the Amazon rainforest can only set off alarm bells,” Žižek said. “The Brazilians, we are told, are killing the lungs of our land. However, if we want to seriously confront the threats to our environment, what we must avoid are precisely these rapid extrapolations that fascinate our imagination.

“This fascination for the catastrophe that immobilizes you is one of the ways of avoiding really facing the crisis,” he continued.

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Žižek said, “What all the talk about how we humanity pose a threat to life, on and off Earth, is our concern about our own fate. The Earth itself is indifferent.

Žižek continued to talk about how humans perceive nature: “Nature is a social category. That is to say, what we perceive as nature is always overdetermined by our social contact.

He criticized certain anthropocentric ideas. “It is the most dangerous anthropocentrism. This idea, nature itself follows a kind of homeostatic balance, natural patterns,” he said.

“There’s Mother Nature, but it’s cold and cruel, to put it mildly, but that in no way implies that we should relax and trust our future.”

Additionally, Žižek addressed what he perceives as the dangers of modern science.

“Science and technology today are no longer just about understanding and replicating natural processes,” Žižek said. “We are trying to generate new life forms that will surprise us. The goal is no longer just to dominate nature as it is, but to generate something new, bigger, stronger than ordinary nature, including ourselves.

Žižek concluded by arguing for a radical change in the market economy.

“I claim that if there will not be a kind of abolition of the market, let’s say a socialization of the economy in the sense that we will have to make decisions [on] what to produce, how to coordinate, what cannot be left to the market,” he said. “If we don’t take this path, then we are lost.”

In a later interview with Endres regarding Žižek’s lecture and its connection to universality, Endres said, “He spoke of a universal object in a sense, or rather of its non-existence.”

“Nature, what is it and how is it somehow misused in political projects, how it has certain shortcomings,” Endres said.

“It spoke a lot to the second term of our title, which is pips,” he continued. “It’s much more interesting when things fail because they reveal an underlying structure than going straight to the thing and describing it.”

This lecture was part of a Department of Comparative Literature series on “Universality and its pitfalls” organized by Endres.

Endres encouraged people to continue attending the lecture series.

“I hope people are not only interested in the big names, but also open to exploring new theories. [and] new people,” he said.

The conference, entitled “Unbehagen in der Natur’: Thinking about the end of nature”, took place on Wednesday, November 2 at McCosh Hall.

Jackie Zhou is a news contributor for “Prince”. Please direct any requests for corrections to the corrections on dailyprincetonian.com.

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Editorial – Journal #131 November 2022 https://ramiroledesma.com/editorial-journal-131-november-2022/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 18:23:46 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/editorial-journal-131-november-2022/ In this issue of e-flow log, deep looks at the past hope to give meaning to the present by plunging into the original abysses and the first promises of the architects of history. Mi You brings us a refreshing and constructive analysis of this year’s documenta fifteen, its curators, its planned organizational structure and its […]]]>

In this issue of e-flow log, deep looks at the past hope to give meaning to the present by plunging into the original abysses and the first promises of the architects of history. Mi You brings us a refreshing and constructive analysis of this year’s documenta fifteen, its curators, its planned organizational structure and its audience. Olga Olina, Hallie Ayres and Anton Vidokle’s chart suppressed, banned and otherwise extinct languages ​​in a resource that spans geography and time from 1367 to present, showing an ongoing process of erasure and survival that roughly corresponds to the rise of nation states.

Sometimes it is only possible to understand the present by seeing what has been erased later. Nicola Perugini and Tommaso Fiscaletti explore the fascist bloodlines that keep reappearing in their research on the public baths where young Italian proletarians were sent every summer in the 1930s for regimens of strict hygiene, sunshine and outdoor worship of Mussolini . Leon Dische Becker and Cosmo Bjorkenheim argue that some things are best left in the past, advising Hollywood directors against mounting a fourth HG Wells remake. The island of Doctor Moreau. Better to leave his curses and racist colonial critiques in the dust.

In issue 23 of e-flow log (March 2011), Bruno Latour recounted an uneven 1922 conversation between Henri Bergson and Albert Einstein, in which Einstein almost entirely rejected Bergson’s deep, yet critical, engagement with the theory of relativity. “After Bergson had spoken for thirty minutes,” Latour wrote, “Einstein made a terse two-minute remark, ending with this damning phrase: ‘There is therefore no time for philosophers; there is only one psychological time different from the time of the physicist. Latour, looking at the end of the 20th century from 2011, underlined the rejection of philosophy, politics and art by this typical scientist. At the time, he asked himself: “Can we do better at the start of the 21st century? In other words, is it possible to give Bergson another chance to argue that, no, he is not talking about subjective time and space, but rather offering an alternative to Einstein’s cosmology? Bruno Latour passed away in October, and in this issue, his colleague Martin Guinard shares the memories of a thinker who never stopped asking massive questions and making connections. Thanks to his unlimited writing and numerous collaborations, he has never ceased to marvel at our world.

By following okra, mustard greens, freekeh and other flora through different times and places, Pelin Tan shares the entangled and exiled existences and resiliences of human refugees and the plants that survive with them. In a conversation between Matt Peterson and Sabu Kohso on radiation and revolution (also the title of Kohso’s recent book), Kohso traces deep and interconnected fault lines between the ongoing aftermath of the Fukushima disaster and the Covid pandemic. , as well as the imperial and also liberating history of militant movements in Tokyo, New York and wherever people rise up against a disintegrating world.

In the second part of Su Wei’s essay on emotion in post-1949 Chinese art, he writes explicitly about examining the past to understand China’s present. Within this framework, he also describes the historical and forward-looking visions of late 20th-century artists, such as artist and theorist Zhang Anzhi, and his belief that art was a force for “creating emotions for a new world”. Su Wei asks, “Do brief flashes of emotion in historic moments of uncertainty help us see the maze we currently find ourselves in?”

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Nation marks 146th birth anniversary of Allama Iqbal – Pakistan https://ramiroledesma.com/nation-marks-146th-birth-anniversary-of-allama-iqbal-pakistan/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 22:26:28 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/nation-marks-146th-birth-anniversary-of-allama-iqbal-pakistan/ Pakistan The nation celebrates the 146th anniversary of the birth of Allama Iqbal The federal government has declared November 9 a public holiday. November 09, 2022 03:15 LAHORE (Dunya News) – The 146th birth anniversary of national poet Dr Allama Muhammad […]]]>



Pakistan


The federal government has declared November 9 a public holiday.





LAHORE (Dunya News) – The 146th birth anniversary of national poet Dr Allama Muhammad Iqbal is celebrated today (Wednesday) across the country with traditional zeal and enthusiasm.

The federal government has declared November 9 as a public holiday, on the birth anniversary of the country’s national poet and philosopher, Allama Muhammad Iqbal.

Allama Muhammad Iqbal was born in Sialkot on November 9, 1877. He is also recognized as a national poet, and known by the names of Muffakir-e-Pakistan (thinker of Pakistan), Shair-e-Mashriq (poet of the east) and Hakeemul Ummat (doctor of the Muslim ummah) and is credited with sparking pan-Islamic thought among Muslims in the subcontinent.

Allama Iqbal considered the idea of ​​a separate homeland for Muslims in the subcontinent‚ which led to the creation of Pakistan in 1947.

He is also considered one of the most important figures in literature with literary works in Urdu and Persian. Asrar-e-Khudi, Payam-i-Mashriq, Bang-i-Dara, Bal-i-Jibril, Zarb-i Kalim and Armughan-e-Hijaz were among his best works.

The nation celebrates this day with dedication to honor the great philosopher-poet and highlight his achievements.

Various political‚ social and cultural organizations have organized special programs to portray Iqbal’s philosophy‚ of life and his contribution to the awareness of Muslims in South Asia.

Iqbal was a modern era Sufi poet who stirred up a revolutionary spirit in the nation through his poetry. His poetry has been translated into Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, English and several other languages ​​and is considered a great philosopher worldwide.

Unfortunately, he could not see the independence of Pakistan and died on April 21, 1938.

The day’s events include the Changing of the Guards ceremony at Mazar-e-Iqbal in Lahore.

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Betras: “Decisions are made by those who show up” — so vote https://ramiroledesma.com/betras-decisions-are-made-by-those-who-show-up-so-vote/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/betras-decisions-are-made-by-those-who-show-up-so-vote/ Lawyer David Betras Because this is my last opportunity to discuss Tuesday’s general election, I want to share some information and inspiration about our democracy. I will not endorse any candidate or issue, as I am confident that most of my readers are aware of my political leanings and beliefs. But I want to encourage […]]]>

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Lawyer David Betras

Because this is my last opportunity to discuss Tuesday’s general election, I want to share some information and inspiration about our democracy.

I will not endorse any candidate or issue, as I am confident that most of my readers are aware of my political leanings and beliefs. But I want to encourage everyone, including those of you who disagree with me, to exercise your right to vote because, as the wise philosopher Jed Bartlet once said, “decisions are taken by those who present themselves”.

So please introduce yourself.

Here is the information segment of our program.

Polls will open at 6:30 a.m. Tuesday and close at 7:30 p.m. If you line up to vote at 7:30 p.m. or before, you will be allowed to vote.

If you don’t know the location of your polling station, you can search for it here.

If you want to take a look and study your constituency ballot in advance – which I always do – you can access it here.

Don’t want to wait until Tuesday to vote? You can advance vote in person at your local election commission from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday. The Mahoning County Board of Elections is located at 345 Oak Hill Ave., Youngstown. Trumbull’s office is located at 2911 Youngstown Road SE, Warren. Do you live in Columbiana? Meet at 7989 Dickey Drive, Lisbon.

If you have an absentee ballot but have not yet returned it, it must be postmarked by Monday. If not returned by mail, ballots must be received by the Elections Office no later than 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday. You can drop your ballot in the drop box located outside the election office or bring it to the office.

Under Ohio law, you must have a valid ID to vote. Acceptable forms include federal or state government-issued photo identification, bank statements, and utility bills. A full list is available here.

Here is the inspiring part of the show.

First, I know that some people are now questioning the integrity of our electoral process. I have been honored to serve as a member of the Mahoning County Board of Elections for over a decade, and can say unequivocally that voter fraud is a myth and that America’s elections are the most free and fair in the world. Period. End of the story.

If you’re looking for a reason to vote, maybe these quotes will motivate you to do your civic duty:

Civil rights hero John Lewis: “Voting is valuable. It is the most powerful non-violent tool we have in a democratic society, and we must use it.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt: “No one will ever disenfranchise the American people except the American people themselves and the only way to do that is to not vote.”

President Abraham Lincoln: “The ballot is stronger than the bullet.”

Thomas Jefferson: “We don’t have a majority government. We have a majority government that participates.

michelle obama: “So when you’re not voting, what you’re really doing is letting someone else take power over your own life.”

Writer/Editor George Jean Nathan: “Bad public servants are elected by good citizens who don’t vote.”

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison: “Not voting is not a protest. It is a surrender. »

British Prime Minister Winston Churchill: “Democracy has been said to be the worst form of government except all the other forms that have been tried from time to time.”

The eminent lawyer and philosopher David Betras: “If you don’t vote, don’t bh.”

Now get out there and vote.

Attorney David Betras, senior partner at Betras, Kopp & Markota LLC., directs the firm’s non-litigation activities and practices criminal defense law in state and federal courts. He practiced law for 35 years. Do you have a legal question you would like answered here? Send it to news@mahoningmatters.com.

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DATTOPANT THENGADI: PERSONALITY AND IDEAS https://ramiroledesma.com/dattopant-thengadi-personality-and-ideas/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 10:09:22 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/dattopant-thengadi-personality-and-ideas/ When I decided to pursue a Ph.D. in political science, I was looking for a subject on which I could base my research. I have wanted to study various discourses on nationalism in India lately, but have not found anything new as it is a hotly debated topic. It was then that my supervisor Prof. […]]]>

When I decided to pursue a Ph.D. in political science, I was looking for a subject on which I could base my research. I have wanted to study various discourses on nationalism in India lately, but have not found anything new as it is a hotly debated topic.

It was then that my supervisor Prof. Pawan Kumar Sharma suggested the name Shri Dattopant Thengadi Ji. It was the first time I heard his name and so I took my time before making a decision. When I started reading about Thengadi Ji, I realized that he was an exemplary figure, not only a politician but also a philosopher and a visionary. Although he is not recognized as an established theorist on nationalism, his ideas provide a refreshing and extraordinary perspective on Indian nationalism.

What captured my imagination and got me contemplating was the distinction he made between Rashtra and Nation and other Indian concepts which Thengadi Ji says have been mistranslated. I realized that there was a misunderstanding of Indian nationalism and it was mostly seen as right-wing propaganda to advance their ideology. From now on, I decided to follow the suggestion of my professor and the research subject of my doctorate. IS DISCOURSE OF NATIONALISM IN INDIA: A STUDY OF THE IDEAS OF DATTOPANT THENGADI.

It is a colossal task to capture such a great personality – a philosopher, a visionary, an organizer, an economist, a speaker, an author and an eminent thinker in a single article. But here I am trying to write about Shri Thengadi Ji and his ideas.

Dattopant Bapurao Thengadi was an Indian Hindu ideologue, trade union leader and the founder of Swadeshi Jagaran Manch, Bharatiya Mazdoor Sangh and Bharatiya Kisan Sangh.

He created these organizations on the principles of Hindutva and nationalism and did not follow the then prevalent Marxist ideology as his ideas differed significantly, for example Marxism believed in class conflict but Thengadi Ji spoke of the convergence of classes. In reality, Thengadi Ji was unhappy with the two Western models of development, viz. capitalism and socialism. Therefore, he proposed the “third way” of socio-economic development based on Sanatan’s dharma ideology. Not only this, he is also credited with exemplary speeches and books in which he made a clear distinction between Indian concepts and their Western translation and spoke of his well-founded belief in Indian culture. Although he served as a member of parliament for Rajya Sabha for two terms from 1964 to 1976, he was a man of conviction and a strong advocate of simple living, clarity of thought and self-reliance. He was a full-time RSS pracharak and called himself karyakarta.

Thengadi Ji was not only a philosopher but also a visionary, well ahead of his time, who shaped the idea of ​​Atmanirbhar Bharat decades ago. He let his ideas develop over time and global changes. He laid the foundations of the economic philosophy of the RSS and was one of the preeminent ideologues of Swadeshi economics.

Thengadi Ji was a firm believer in Indian culture and its ultimate success and was inspired by ancient Indian concepts. It was during the centenary celebrations of the Universal Vedantic Message of Swami Vivekanand and the Chicago Speech that Shri Thengadi Ji first spoke of a global economic system that should contribute to a peaceful world, for this he suggested the Indian approach that emphasizes a just and non-exploitative world. order. Its philosophy is inspired by the Sanatan dharma which, according to Thengadi Ji, presents universal laws that are constant and compatible with the constantly changing world order. Elaborating further on these universal laws, Thengadi Ji pointed out how these can serve as guiding principles for the economic system that is consistent with well-being and not exploitation. These laws are: ‘AVIBHAKTAM VIBHAKETSHU’, to perceive unity among all diversities, and ‘VASUDHAIVA KUTUMBAKAM’, inter-relationship of a world. Thengadi Ji has wonderfully explained these laws as the eternal message of Sanatan Dharma and their relevance in contemporary times. Affirming the importance and relevance of these principles, Thengadi Ji insisted on unlearning bad and anti-future lessons to have a balanced understanding of the past, only then the desired present can be achieved.

One of the most important things he pointed out decades ago was the fact that the development or ideology of a particular region cannot be seen as globalization, because living conditions, Resource availability and everything else differs from region to region. Therefore, a holistic view of globalization and development must be considered before standardizing anything. Only then could an ideal world order be envisioned.

Thengadi Ji criticized Indian intellectuals who regard anything Western as standard and below Hindu standards and called for further study of Indian concepts which have been mistranslated and therefore widely misunderstood.

In conclusion, I would like to state that Thengadi Ji’s ideas and beliefs regarding the provision of universal health care, energy access and poverty alleviation using the Indian approach should be further and sincerely investigated. implemented as this would not only reinforce the concept of self-reliance but also promote India’s contribution to humanity.

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Emphasizing the value of love, forgiveness: Brother Mac to students in a farewell message https://ramiroledesma.com/emphasizing-the-value-of-love-forgiveness-brother-mac-to-students-in-a-farewell-message/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 10:20:40 +0000 https://ramiroledesma.com/emphasizing-the-value-of-love-forgiveness-brother-mac-to-students-in-a-farewell-message/ Hold on to love, Brother Brendan MacCarthaigh said as he left for his hometown of Dublin, bidding farewell to the city, where he spent more than six decades of his life teaching students and to build lives. In his farewell message to the students of St Joseph’s College, Bowbazar, some of whom are teenagers and […]]]>

Hold on to love, Brother Brendan MacCarthaigh said as he left for his hometown of Dublin, bidding farewell to the city, where he spent more than six decades of his life teaching students and to build lives.

In his farewell message to the students of St Joseph’s College, Bowbazar, some of whom are teenagers and elderly now, Brother Mac, as he was affectionately known, emphasized the value of love and forgiveness, especially at a time ‘when some politicians are dividing the country and spreading hatred’.

The 84-year-old educator had to leave India due to visa issues.

One of his former students, Rajesh Arora, said: “When we learned that his brother had been advised to leave the country because he had inadvertently failed to complete certain visa documents, many of us offered help from the authorities. “He told us, ‘I’m a teacher and I wouldn’t want to twist anyone’s arm.’ That sense of righteousness is so rare these days, but so natural to him.” Brother Mac, at the farewell program held in the city on the eve of his departure, asked people to make love an inevitable part of their value system.

“If you hate that Muslims are Hindus, you are wrong. If you hate that Hindus are Muslims, you are wrong. If you don’t like someone, you’re wrong,” he said.

”Ask yourself important questions. In my country, Protestants were trained to hit Catholics and Catholics were trained to hit Protestants. To some extent, this still continues. In India, some politicians are dividing the country and spreading hatred,” the educator said.

Religion is just a social construct, with different people adopting different ways of offering prayers, he said.

Arora, a 1985 student, said Brother Mac has over the years also worked for the welfare of disadvantaged people, trying to touch their lives with education.

”Brother Brendan MacCarthiagh quickly rose from college professor to friend, philosopher and guide. He was a constant source of inspiration not only to me, but to all who had the pleasure of knowing him,” added Arora, a medical entrepreneur.

Another former student, Imran Zaki of the 1984 band, also fondly recalled his association with Brother Mac.

”He was not only a good educator. He was someone who treated all his students with empathy, compassion, supporting them in every way. Her children are spread all over the world and their messages kept pouring in during her farewell ceremony. “But, we shouldn’t call it a farewell as Brother Brendan will continue to guide us with his teachings even though he is not physically present in India,” the city-based social entrepreneur said.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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